NORTHWEST PASSAGE 

NORTHWEST PASSAGE 

Kangerlussuaq to Nome, Alaska

Aug 10, 2022 to Sep 5, 2022

26 Days

SeaDream Innovation

32223

The Northwest Passage offers a truly exhilarating travel experience. You’ll be enchanted by singularly shaped hunks of ice, glowing ethereal blue from within. After this journey, you’ll join the illustrious and elite circle of daring explorers who mapped the way for this unforgettable adventure.   

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Aug 10, 2022 Kangerlussuaq,
Greenland
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Aug 11, 2022 Eternity Fjord *,
Greenland
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 12, 2022 Sisimiut,
Greenland
Early Morning Evening
Aug 13, 2022 Disko Bay,
Greenland
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 14, 2022 At Sea,
Aug 15, 2022 Clyde River, Nunavut *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 16, 2022 Baffin Island,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 17, 2022 Baffin Island,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 18, 2022 Pond Inlet, Nunavut,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 19, 2022 Devon Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 20, 2022 Ellesmere Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 21, 2022 Croker Bay,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 22, 2022 South Devon Fjords *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 23, 2022 Beechy Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 24, 2022 South Devon Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 25, 2022 Exploration Day,
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 26, 2022 Bellot Strait *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 27, 2022 Larsen Sound *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 28, 2022 Victoria Strait *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 29, 2022 Cambridge Bay *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 30, 2022 At Sea,
Aug 31, 2022 Ulukhaktok (Holman) *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Sep 01, 2022 Walker Bay/Smoking Hills *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Sep 02, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 03, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 04, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 05, 2022 Nome, Alaska,
United States
Morning 8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • Kangerlussuaq

    Lying at the inland terminus of a lengthy fjord with the same name, Kangerlussuaq provides ready access to Greenland’s immense ice sheet. The town’s economy centers on the airport, which was built by U.S. forces during WWII and is the largest in Greenland. The absorbing Kangerlussuaq Museum, found in buildings that were once part of the American base, details the airport’s unique role during the global conflict and the subsequent Cold War. The town’s main attraction, however, is undoubtedly Greenland’s magnificent ice sheet, which is only a few miles away. As you travel through the frigid hinterlands, be on the lookout for the region’s abundant musk ox and caribou, which flock to the rivers and lakes strewn about the landscape. You’ll be humbled by the nearly 200-foot-high wall of the Russell Glacier, a living mass of frozen water that advances nearly 100 feet every year and regularly shaves off huge sections of its icy façade. If you’re curious about what lies beyond, book a sightseeing flight for an unforgettable bird’s-eye view over one of the world’s largest Arctic expanses.

  • Eternity Fjord *

  • Sisimiut

    Just a few miles above the Arctic Circle, you’ll find seaside Sisimiut, which fans out on a plain beneath imposing Nasaasaaq mountain. The town’s name translates as “the people at the fox burrows,” an intriguing appellation that alludes to the region’s earliest dwellers. Gain insight at the Sisimiut Museum, whose entrance is reached through a spellbinding whalebone arch. The enlightening exhibits cover four thousand years of history, from artifacts of the ancient Saqqaq peoples to an 18th-century kayak, with an outdoor section that includes a reproduction of a furnished early 20th-century peat house. A stroll around town reveals other compelling historic buildings, such as the 1725 Gammelhusset, or Old House, and the 1775 Bethel Church, an unassuming but highly picturesque sanctuary painted in vivid blue. There are myriad hiking opportunities in the surrounding wilderness, with a standout being the relatively easy ascent of Palasip Qaqqaa Mountain. From the summit, you’ll appreciate extraordinary views of the town and a rugged landscape of winding fjords, wind-swept islands and serrated mountain ranges that dominate the horizon.

  • Disko Bay

    The vast expanse of Disko Bay is an environmental treasure that exemplifies the best of Greenland’s untamed wilderness. Emerging from the bay’s eastern coast, the enormous Sermeq Kujalleq, or Jakobshavn Glacier, releases about 10% of Greenland’s icebergs into the bay’s frosty waters. Some of these ice chunks can be truly gargantuan, with heights of over half a mile on record. Listen closely and you’ll discern the rumbling of these newborn giants as they slough off the edge of the glacier. For centuries, hardy Inuit and Norse settlers hunted here, harvesting the pelts of seals, walrus tusks and the bounty of resources carried by whales. These creatures still populate the area, so keep an eye out for clusters of rowdy walruses lounging on the shore, a contented seal resting atop an ice floe and humpback whales splashing through the waves. Perhaps you’ll glimpse some of the humpback’s more exotic relatives, including orcas, pilot whales or narwhals, whose distinctive tusk has earned them the moniker “unicorn of the sea.” In Disko Bay, you’ll feel as if you’ve been granted admission into one of Earth’s grandest natural playgrounds.

  • At Sea

  • Clyde River, Nunavut *

  • Baffin Island

    Despite being the fifth-largest island in the world, only a few thousand people call Baffin home, which means its plentiful natural gifts remain wholly pristine. Most of the population resides in the friendly town of Iqaliut, deep within Frobisher Bay. From here, it’s a short distance to Sylvia Grinnell Territorial Park, an undulating expanse of tundra flecked with intriguing ruins of the Thule people as well as vibrant wildflowers that flourish during the warmer seasons. In the artist’s haven of Cape Dorset, browse captivating Inuit handicrafts, including soapstone carvings, colorful tapestries and native clothing. Along the island’s eastern coast, frozen Auyuittuq National Park is the origin point of glaciers that snake into Baffin Bay. Countless fjords line the irregular shoreline, each flanked by towering mountains that contort into fantastic shapes. Near Baffin’s northern tip, Sirmilik National Park offers the avid outdoor explorer the opportunity to snowmobile across ice-covered terrain, perhaps encountering seals and polar bears, or to sea kayak in search of narwhals and Beluga whales. In the evening, you might revitalize over a dinner of local delicacies such as arctic char with musk ox sausages accompanied with bannock bread generously slathered in tundra blueberry jam.

  • Pond Inlet, Nunavut

    For centuries a wellspring of dashed hopes and herculean triumphs, the Northwest Passage was viewed as the ultimate trophy for European powers seeking to find a faster trading route to Asia. It wasn’t until 1906, however, that after many hardships Norwegian Roald Amundsen completed the challenging feat aboard the compact herring boat Gjøa. He would be amazed to learn that just over a century later travelers would be able to accomplish the same journey in a matter of days and in plush comfort. Because weather and the movement of the Arctic pack ice aren’t always predictable, each itinerary may vary. You’ll likely visit Baffin Island, the fifth largest island in the world and a sublime realm of soaring peaks, vast plains and exquisite wildlife. Amid the island’s awe-inspiring eastern fjords, you’ll find the town of Clyde River, or Kangiqtugaapik in Inuktitut, and discover the fabulous whalebone carvings of the local artists. In Pond Inlet, or Mittimatalik, browse splendid wall hangings, red and green soapstone carvings and other unique handicrafts. As you sail the waters offshore, look for the legendary narwhal, whose spiraling tusk can measure up to nine feet long and was once used to prove the existence of unicorns. On starkly bewitching Devon Island, the largest uninhabited island on Earth, visit an abandoned outpost of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and hike the tundra searching for ringed and bearded seals, musk oxen, Arctic hare, walrus and the solitary polar bear. While you cruise to Croker Bay, which is fed by two glorious glaciers, pods of narwhals and beluga whales may accompany the ship. You’ll learn about Sir John Franklin’s disastrous 1845 expedition on Beechy Island, where grave markers memorialize the crew of 129, all of whom perished in the icy wastes. Wander Somerset Island’s derelict outpost of Fort Ross, once a trading hub for fur trappers, and keep binoculars ready for white-rumped sandpipers, snow geese, black-bellied plovers and king eiders. The rugged coastline of Victoria Island, with its many protected coves, offers ample opportunities for exploration along serene expanses of rust-hued grasses that come alive with blooms of vividly purple oxytropis arctobia. Cambridge Bay, or Iqaluktuuttiaq, offers access to Ovayuk Territorial Park, filled with meaning for nomadic Inuit, who tell tales of three giants who starved here and formed three hills inhabited by caribou, Arctic fox and lemmings. In tiny Ulukhaktokk, you’ll be surprised to find the world’s northernmost golf course as well as renowned artisans that create traditional Inuit art and prints. During your meanderings from one island to another, you’ll be enchanted by singularly shaped hunks of ice, glowing from within in ethereal blue. At Franklin Bay, prepare for the breathtaking sight of the Smoking Hills, bluffs of bituminous shale that are in a constant state of combustion. Watch plumes of smoke emerge from a charred landscape scarred in shades of crimson and saffron, as if Vulcan himself were patrolling these shores. After your exhilarating voyage through the Northwest Passage, you’ll join the illustrious and elite circle of daring explorers who mapped the way for this unforgettable adventure.

  • Devon Island *

    Relish a chance to visit the place on Earth that most resembles Mars, according to NASA scientists. Devon is the world’s largest uninhabited island, a mysterious landmass of over 20,000 square miles, blanketed by ice on its eastern side and bewitchingly barren to the west. During the brief growing season, bursts of color emerge from the usually frozen tundra, and wildlife such as musk ox, black guillemots and northern fulmars make their presence known. In sheltered Dundas Harbor, along the island’s southern coast, roam the ghostly remains of an outpost established by Hudson’s Bay Company in 1924. You might be amazed to discover several wood buildings still stand, only visited by the occasional walrus. Nearby Croker Bay is fed by two colossal glaciers, icy titans that release glittering icebergs into the water. With luck, you’ll catch sight of a polar bear watching over a seal hole atop one of the masses of ice. Incredibly, even in this remote place the cycle of life is as vital as ever.

  • Ellesmere Island *

  • Croker Bay

    For centuries a wellspring of dashed hopes and herculean triumphs, the Northwest Passage was viewed as the ultimate trophy for European powers seeking to find a faster trading route to Asia. It wasn’t until 1906, however, that after many hardships Norwegian Roald Amundsen completed the challenging feat aboard the compact herring boat Gjøa. He would be amazed to learn that just over a century later travelers would be able to accomplish the same journey in a matter of days and in plush comfort. Because weather and the movement of the Arctic pack ice aren’t always predictable, each itinerary may vary. You’ll likely visit Baffin Island, the fifth largest island in the world and a sublime realm of soaring peaks, vast plains and exquisite wildlife. Amid the island’s awe-inspiring eastern fjords, you’ll find the town of Clyde River, or Kangiqtugaapik in Inuktitut, and discover the fabulous whalebone carvings of the local artists. In Pond Inlet, or Mittimatalik, browse splendid wall hangings, red and green soapstone carvings and other unique handicrafts. As you sail the waters offshore, look for the legendary narwhal, whose spiraling tusk can measure up to nine feet long and was once used to prove the existence of unicorns. On starkly bewitching Devon Island, the largest uninhabited island on Earth, visit an abandoned outpost of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and hike the tundra searching for ringed and bearded seals, musk oxen, Arctic hare, walrus and the solitary polar bear. While you cruise to Croker Bay, which is fed by two glorious glaciers, pods of narwhals and beluga whales may accompany the ship. You’ll learn about Sir John Franklin’s disastrous 1845 expedition on Beechy Island, where grave markers memorialize the crew of 129, all of whom perished in the icy wastes. Wander Somerset Island’s derelict outpost of Fort Ross, once a trading hub for fur trappers, and keep binoculars ready for white-rumped sandpipers, snow geese, black-bellied plovers and king eiders. The rugged coastline of Victoria Island, with its many protected coves, offers ample opportunities for exploration along serene expanses of rust-hued grasses that come alive with blooms of vividly purple oxytropis arctobia. Cambridge Bay, or Iqaluktuuttiaq, offers access to Ovayuk Territorial Park, filled with meaning for nomadic Inuit, who tell tales of three giants who starved here and formed three hills inhabited by caribou, Arctic fox and lemmings. In tiny Ulukhaktokk, you’ll be surprised to find the world’s northernmost golf course as well as renowned artisans that create traditional Inuit art and prints. During your meanderings from one island to another, you’ll be enchanted by singularly shaped hunks of ice, glowing from within in ethereal blue. At Franklin Bay, prepare for the breathtaking sight of the Smoking Hills, bluffs of bituminous shale that are in a constant state of combustion. Watch plumes of smoke emerge from a charred landscape scarred in shades of crimson and saffron, as if Vulcan himself were patrolling these shores. After your exhilarating voyage through the Northwest Passage, you’ll join the illustrious and elite circle of daring explorers who mapped the way for this unforgettable adventure.

  • South Devon Fjords *

  • Beechy Island *

  • South Devon Island *

  • Exploration Day

  • Bellot Strait *

  • Larsen Sound *

  • Victoria Strait *

  • Cambridge Bay *

    The Inuit name of Ikaluktutiak, which means “good fishing place,” explains the allure of this isolated yet starkly beautiful settlement. Located on the southern coast of enormous Victoria Island, the area has been valued for millennia by the native peoples, who thrived on the region’s musk ox, caribou, ringed seals, Arctic char and lake trout. In the town’s shops, you’ll appreciate the skill of the local artists, who create intricate carvings in soapstone, antler, ivory and turquoise gemstone among other materials. Explore the surrounding coves and islands aboard a sea kayak, perhaps paddling up to the solitary Old Stone Church or encountering migratory nesting geese. In nearby Ovayok Territorial Park, traverse a moon-like landscape and discover Ovayok, also known as Mount Pelly, a wide promontory that rises 656 feet in height and provides a relatively easy hike. Along the way, vividly hued wildflowers brighten the path and musk ox may be seen roaming the plains. While enjoying uninterrupted views in all directions from the top, ponder the legend of the giants who collapsed here, creating the very hill you are standing on.

  • Ulukhaktok (Holman) *

  • Walker Bay/Smoking Hills *

  • Nome, Alaska

    Soak up true Alaskan wilderness in Nome, a small settlement famed as the terminus of the Iditarod Sled Dog Race. Although the event takes place in March, you can capture photos of the momentous Iditarod Burled Arch, final crossing line of the 1,049-mile trek. Learn about the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, only accessible by air, at Nome’s visitor’s center, where park rangers provide illuminating insight about the landmass that once connected Asia to the Americas. Just north of town, the extraordinary White Alice Site harkens back to the Cold War, featuring gigantic radar installations that predate the advent of satellite communications. While out of town, catch sight of some of the region’s striking wildlife, which includes musk oxen, golden eagles and peregrine falcons, and visit one of the many gold dredges scattered about the countryside, a reminder that Nome was briefly a booming gold rush town. Absorb the storied history of the region at the terrific Carrie M. McLain Memorial Museum and learn about the Three Lucky Swedes, the first to exploit the area’s bounty and subjects of a sculpture in Nome’s Anvil City Square, where the world’s largest gold pan offers an amusing photo opportunity.


Suites & Staterooms

Heyerdahl Suite

From: $ 88,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Eriksson Suite

From: $ 88,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Amundsen Suite

From: $ 66,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Sverdrup Suite

From: $ 63,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Archer Suite

From: $ 63,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Nansen Suite

From: $ 57,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Adventurer Suite Deck 7

From: $ 52,999*

Journey Suite Deck 7

From: $ 40,999*

Journey Suite Deck 6

From: $ 39,999*

Journey Suite Deck 5

From: $ 38,999*

Discovery Suite Oceanview

From: $ 32,999*

*Government, Port, Document Issuance, Handling & Service fees: $780 per guest



Please Note: Fares are capacity controlled and may change without notice. The fares are per person based on double occupancy. Single and third person rates are also available. SeaDream Yacht Club strongly recommends that all guests purchase travel insurance.


Yachting Land Adventures & Activities

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Testimonials

At SeaDream, our experience was great in the lap of nature (at sea). The hospitality, courtesy and responsibility was at its height... flowing throughout the voyage. Really a memorable experience!! Mitu & Harjit SinghMumbai, India
Cuisine always delicious & freshly prepared – nothing too much trouble. Mrs Fiona LincolnCardiff, Great Britain