KAMCHATKA EXPLORATION  

KAMCHATKA EXPLORATION  

Nome, Alaska to Kanazawa

Sep 5, 2022 to Sep 21, 2022

16 Days

SeaDream Innovation

32224

The land of fire and ice, this vast volcanic peninsula is comprised almost entirely of wilderness. You’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with equally marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. This region is among the most enigmatic in the world.  

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Sep 05, 2022 Nome, Alaska,
United States
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Sep 06, 2022 INTERNATIONAL DATE LINE - LOSE A DAY Late Evening Late Evening
Sep 07, 2022 At Sea,
Afternoon Evening
Sep 08, 2022 Gabriella Bay,
Russian Federation
Afternoon Evening
Sep 09, 2022 Nataliya *,
Russian Federation
Morning Evening
Sep 10, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 11, 2022 Komandor Islands *,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Evening
Sep 12, 2022 Kamenistaya Bay*,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Afternoon
Sep 13, 2022 Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Evening
Sep 14, 2022 Atlasov *,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Afternoon
Sep 15, 2022 Srednego Yankicha,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Evening
Sep 16, 2022 Chirpoy *,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Afternoon
Sep 17, 2022 At Sea,
Afternoon Evening
Sep 18, 2022 Rishiri,
Japan
Early Morning Evening
Sep 19, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 20, 2022 Sado Island,
Japan
Morning Evening
Sep 21, 2022 Kanazawa,
Japan
8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • Nome, Alaska

    Soak up true Alaskan wilderness in Nome, a small settlement famed as the terminus of the Iditarod Sled Dog Race. Although the event takes place in March, you can capture photos of the momentous Iditarod Burled Arch, final crossing line of the 1,049-mile trek. Learn about the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, only accessible by air, at Nome’s visitor’s center, where park rangers provide illuminating insight about the landmass that once connected Asia to the Americas. Just north of town, the extraordinary White Alice Site harkens back to the Cold War, featuring gigantic radar installations that predate the advent of satellite communications. While out of town, catch sight of some of the region’s striking wildlife, which includes musk oxen, golden eagles and peregrine falcons, and visit one of the many gold dredges scattered about the countryside, a reminder that Nome was briefly a booming gold rush town. Absorb the storied history of the region at the terrific Carrie M. McLain Memorial Museum and learn about the Three Lucky Swedes, the first to exploit the area’s bounty and subjects of a sculpture in Nome’s Anvil City Square, where the world’s largest gold pan offers an amusing photo opportunity.

  • INTERNATIONAL DATE LINE - LOSE A DAY

  • At Sea

  • Gabriella Bay

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Nataliya *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Komandor Islands *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Kamenistaya Bay*

    Step into a land of giants at Kamenistaya Bay, part of the Kamchatka Peninsula’s vast Kronotsky Nature Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site peppered with myriad geysers and active volcanos that reach for the heavens. From offshore, admire the conical silhouette of these astonishing mountains, which are streaked by rivers of snow and are the source of the region’s awe-inspiring nickname, the Land of Fire and Ice. Black sand beaches rim the bay, testament to eons of volcanic activity. During the warmer season, countless rivers and streams of melted snow rush toward the shore, creating scenic waterfalls and ponds that teem with fish. Eurasia’s largest protected population of brown bears roam the landscape, seeking out the salmon that allows them to grow to sizes of over 1,200 pounds. On the vividly green coastal meadows, you may spot big-horned sheep and marmots along with a variety of seabirds circling above noisy colonies of Steller sea lions. With no human settlements anywhere near, in spectacular Kamenistaya Bay nature has the freedom to reach its ultimate expression without restraint.

  • Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy

    Arriving at the port of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, you might wonder who might be so brazen as to live practically in the shadow of not one but several active volcanoes. The droll locals, however, speak of nearby Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky Mountains affectionately, as if they were simply troublesome but beloved members of the family. Ascend to the summit of Mishennaya Hill for magnificent views of this trio, which periodically cough out plumes of smoke. Further afield lies the tumultuous heart of Kamchatka, a UNESCO World Heritage site for its approximately 300 volcanoes and awe-inspiring scenery of fumaroles, hot springs, mud pots, geysers and lava rivers. Book a helicopter flight over this living landscape, a rainbow of acidic colors, untouched snow and verdant vegetation that thrives against all odds. In the city, the Holy Trinity Orthodox Cathedral dazzles with its polished golden onion domes, the stunning crown to an appealing blue and white façade. The local crab is renowned, so be sure to give it a try along with Pyatiminutka red caviar, an indulgence fit for a tsar that is best enjoyed with a warming sip of vodka.

  • Atlasov *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Srednego Yankicha

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Chirpoy *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Rishiri

    The nearly circular island of Rishiri was formed by a now extinct volcano that rises symmetrically from its very center. Picturesquely draped in jade green vegetation, the mountain is known as Rishiri Fuji for its pleasing similarity to Japan’s cherished symbol, Mount Fuji. Well-tended paths for hiking the volcano are available, but exquisite views of the splendid peak can be had from the idyllic lakes of Himenuma and Otamori. At Kanro Spring, sip revitalizing, crystal-clear water that rushes out from beneath moss-covered boulders. Cycling the coastline of the serene island is another superb option, as Rishiro’s circumference is a mere 35 miles and provides captivating glimpses of fishing villages and quaint shrines. At seaside Senhoshimisaki Park, marvel at fanciful lava rock formations among which curious spotted seals meander. Whether you want to relax at the end of an active day or simply pamper yourself, sink into the soothing waters at Rishirifuji Onsen, a hot spring surrounded by a lovely Japanese garden whose cherry blossom trees burst into pink blooms every spring.

  • Sado Island

    The curiously shaped island of Sado features a low-lying plain that is flanked by two mountain ranges, giving this unique land a shape reminiscent of an anvil. At one end of the flatlands, stroll along lovely Lake Kamo for stunning views of the mountains and their forest-covered slopes, perhaps passing one of the many enchanting shrines found lakeside. Beneath the ground, the Kinzan Gold Mine depicts how this precious ore was extracted during the Edo Period, including animatronics that emulate that difficult conditions of the workers from the era. The island is filled with reminders of its volcanic origins, from black sand beaches to the otherworldly rock formations found along its shores. A memorable way to explore the coastline is aboard a tarai-bune, or tub boat, which is a simple oval barrel piloted by a woman in traditional Meiji-era garb. Bird-lovers will rejoice at the opportunity to see specimens of the endangered Japanese crested ibis, which are carefully protected at the Toki Forest Park Conservation Center. Don’t forget to sample the region’s sake at one of the island’s many breweries, as Niigata Prefecture, where Sado is located, is acclaimed for producing the finest varieties of this beloved Japanese libation.

  • Kanazawa

    The Edo period in Japan was the age of shoguns and samurai, during which Kanazawa Castle, a typical Japanese fortress, was the seat of the powerful Maeda Clan. At the foot of the castle lies the Samurai district, where upper and middle-class warriors made their homes. A restored residence provides a peek into their lives. In the Higashi Chaya District, discover the country’s teahouse heritage. Also intriguing is the 16th century Ninja Temple. Billed as a place of worship, it garnered its sobriquet because of its cunning, hidden defenses. Gardens have long played an important role in Japanese culture. Kenrokuen is considered one of the best, with all the requisite features that make a perfect landscape, including spaciousness, seclusion, abundant water and expansive views. A wide variety of flowering trees provide a vista that changes by the season. Kanazawa also has a few modern surprises. The Museum of Contemporary Art features 21st century artists from around the globe, and its circular architecture does not include a main entrance. For a snack, don’t miss the trendy gold leaf-topped ice cream cone – yes, it is real gold.


Suites & Staterooms

Heyerdahl Suite

From: $ 52,499*

Only 1 Remaining

Eriksson Suite

From: $ 52,499*

Only 1 Remaining

Amundsen Suite

From: $ 37,499*

Only 1 Remaining

Sverdrup Suite

From: $ 35,399*

Only 1 Remaining

Archer Suite

From: $ 35,399*

Only 1 Remaining

Nansen Suite

From: $ 32,199*

Only 1 Remaining

Adventurer Suite Deck 7

From: $ 31,099*

Journey Suite Deck 7

From: $ 22,699*

Journey Suite Deck 6

From: $ 22,299*

Journey Suite Deck 5

From: $ 21,899*

Discovery Suite Oceanview

From: $ 18,299*

*Government, Port, Document Issuance, Handling & Service fees: $450 per guest



Please Note: Fares are capacity controlled and may change without notice. The fares are per person based on double occupancy. Single and third person rates are also available. SeaDream Yacht Club strongly recommends that all guests purchase travel insurance.


Yachting Land Adventures & Activities

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Testimonials

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