Bali (Benoa) to Cairns

Bali (Benoa) to Cairns

Oct 27, 2022 to Nov 12, 2022

16 Days

SeaDream Innovation

32228

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Oct 27, 2022 Bali (Benoa),
Indonesia
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Oct 28, 2022 Sumbawa Besar (Badas Port),
Indonesia
Early Morning Afternoon
Oct 29, 2022 Komodo Island,
Indonesia
Early Morning Evening
Oct 30, 2022 Larantuka, Flores,
Indonesia
Afternoon Evening
Oct 31, 2022 Lembata,
Indonesia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 01, 2022 Gunungapi,
Indonesia
Afternoon Evening
Nov 02, 2022 Banda Neira,
Indonesia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 03, 2022 At Sea,
Nov 04, 2022 Kokas,
Indonesia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 05, 2022 Fakfak (Mommon Bay),
Indonesia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 06, 2022 Triton Bay,
Indonesia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 07, 2022 At Sea,
Nov 08, 2022 At Sea,
Nov 09, 2022 Thursday Island/Cape York,
Australia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 10, 2022 Great Barrier Reef,
Australia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 11, 2022 Lizard Island,
Australia
Early Morning Evening
Nov 12, 2022 Cairns,
Australia
Morning 8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • Bali (Benoa)

  • Sumbawa Besar (Badas Port)

    Sumbawa Besar sits at the foot of the remains of Gunung Tambora, a volcano that exploded with inconceivable force in 1815, creating a “year without summer” across the entire northern hemisphere. It’s a quiet place now, a market town trading in beans, rice and corn cultivated on its outskirts and sold at a lively morning market. In the center of the town is the handsome, late 19th century sultan’s palace constructed in wood and supported by 99 stilts, without the use of a single nail. Outside the city, the welcome is warm in hillside villages, providing an opportunity to connect with locals and their daily lives. Traditional looms turn out distinctly Sumbawan ikat textiles, often embellished by silver and gold threads. The population is Muslim, and an Islamic influence is evident in the fabric, but older elements such as human figures and birds make an appearance too. Saleh Bay and its islands are surrounded by coral reefs and provide opportunities for snorkeling and diving, as well as just lazing in the sun.

  • Komodo Island

  • Larantuka, Flores

  • Lembata

  • Gunungapi

  • Banda Neira

    Banda Neira is one of the Moluccas (now Maluku), the fabled spice islands of yore, shrouded in lofty, aromatic Myristica trees, the source of nutmeg and mace, found exclusively here until the mid 19th century. Access to the spices was much prized and fought over by European explorers. Colonized first by the Portuguese and then the Dutch, the British agreed to withdraw from competition for the territory in exchange for one small island on the other side of the world – New Amsterdam, now known as Manhattan. Nutmeg groves are still there to be explored, and along with clove and cinnamon, the spice is readily available in the town market. These lush islands, an internationally recognized diving spot, are far off the beaten track and surrounded by a sparkling turquoise sea crowded with exquisite corals and alive with abundant ocean life. Relics from the days of the Dutch include a Protestant church, Government House, Fort Belica and the Banda Historical Museum. A stroll around the island allows for visits to small villages. Those looking for a challenge may attempt to climb Gunung Api, the volcano that provides a backdrop to the town.

  • At Sea

  • Kokas

    Kokas is located in West Papua, the Indonesia half of the island that is shared with Papua New Guinea. It is a small town with an unusual array of sights to see. Explore the remains of tunnels constructed by the Japanese during WWII; they were expected to survive direct hits fired by U.S. battleships. Go by boat along the coast to view Papuan rock art, hematite petroglyphs of handprints and animal depictions in red ochre. The age of these artifacts is unknown, but they are surely many thousands of years old and remarkably similar to Aboriginal art in northern Australia. Also found scattered along the limestone rock face are stalactite caves and cliffside graves. As you venture deeper into the limestone labyrinth, you may encounter large areas of sea grass farms. Harvested, dried and sold to outlying towns and cities, it provides the local village with a reliable income. The grass is good for stabilizing coastlines, housing fish, serving as a source of food, protein and ingredients used in medicine. Some sea grass meadows naturally store large quantities of blue carbon and could possibly soak up more change-inducing CO2 than rainforests.

  • Fakfak (Mommon Bay)

    Your first and last impression of this land and seascape will be strikingly vivid color. The dense emerald jungle and turquoise seas as you wind your way around clusters of tiny islets are nothing compared with the psychedelic hues underwater. No need to dive deep – whale sharks, jellyfish and thousands of fish hovering over soft coral gardens are easily viewed by snorkelers. Indonesia has the world’s largest population of mangroves; their mudflats are not built up, so the water is crystal clear, allowing for lots of light penetrating to the bottom. The rainforest behind the mangroves is full of birdlife that also comes in brilliant hues – 380 endemic and a sizeable number of migratory species. In this remote and unspoiled destination, there is no sense of time but the sunrise and sunset. No distractions from the natural richness of life all around you, allowing you not only to look but to really see.

  • Triton Bay

    Triton Bay is sometimes referred to as the Kingdom of the Fishes. Massive schools of fish in every shape, size and color prowl these waters, along with sea creatures from the tiniest pygmy seahorses to enormous whale sharks. Dive sites vary: vibrant soft coral gardens, huge black coral bushes, massive boulders and sharp pinnacles. Most are accessible only from the sea, as sheer limestone cliffs line much of the coast, though it is punctuated by the proverbial idyllic white sand, palm-fringed beaches set on a jade green sea. First surveyed in 2006, the entire region is still being explored. This is also second largest rainforest in the world, drenched in luxuriant tropical plant life. There are ancient paintings adorning the walls of caves and welcoming villages to visit. If this isn’t paradise, it comes pretty close.

  • Thursday Island/Cape York

  • Great Barrier Reef

  • Lizard Island

  • Cairns


Suites & Staterooms

Heyerdahl Suite

From: $ 37,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Eriksson Suite

From: $ 37,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Amundsen Suite

From: $ 28,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Sverdrup Suite

From: $ 26,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Archer Suite

From: $ 26,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Nansen Suite

From: $ 24,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Large Suite with Balcony Deck 7

From: $ 19,999*

Suite with Balcony Deck 7

From: $ 15,199*

Suite with Balcony Deck 6

From: $ 14,699*

Suite with Balcony Deck 5

From: $ 14,399*

Suite with Oceanview

From: $ 11,999*

*Government, Port, Document Issuance, Handling & Service fees: $960 per guest



Please Note: Fares are capacity controlled and may change without notice. The fares are per person based on double occupancy. Single and third person rates are also available. SeaDream Yacht Club strongly recommends that all guests purchase travel insurance.


Yachting Land Adventures & Activities

Pre-Book Online for 10% savings

Prices are per person, in USD. Duration is in hours.


Testimonials

This was our first cruise and we were impressed by every crew member's attitude and eagerness to serve. Would be hard to top SeaDream. You have set the bar very high! Mr & Mrs Arthur SwansonOklahoma City, OK
It was truly a Dream voyage!...The food was awesome! Not a single complaint from us! The wines, cocktails and all other beverages were excellent! Peter Lundgren & Hannes KarlssonStockholm, Sweden