Christchurch (Lyttleton) to Sydney

Christchurch (Lyttleton) to Sydney

Dec 18, 2022 to Jan 2, 2023

15 Days

SeaDream Innovation

32232

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Dec 18, 2022 Christchurch (Lyttleton),
New Zealand
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Dec 19, 2022 Picton,
New Zealand
Morning Evening
Dec 20, 2022 Nelson,
New Zealand
Morning Evening
Dec 21, 2022 At Sea,
Dec 22, 2022 Dusky Sound,
New Zealand
Morning Evening
Dec 23, 2022 Milford Sound,
New Zealand
Morning Afternoon
Dec 24, 2022 At Sea,
Dec 25, 2022 At Sea,
Dec 26, 2022 Hobart, Tasmania,
Australia
Morning Late Evening
Dec 27, 2022 Wineglass Bay,
Australia
Morning Evening
Dec 28, 2022 Flinders Island,
Australia
Morning Evening
Dec 29, 2022 At Sea,
Dec 30, 2022 Sydney,
Australia
Morning Late Evening
Dec 31, 2022 Sydney,
Australia
Late Evening Late Evening
Jan 01, 2023 Sydney,
Australia
Late Evening Late Evening
Jan 02, 2023 Sydney,
Australia
Late Evening 8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • Christchurch (Lyttleton)

    Struck by an earthquake in 2011, the vibrant city of Christchurch has bounced back more energized than ever. You’ll drop anchor in the adjacent port of Lyttelton, a bohemian town with a lively arts scene and charming hillside homes. Ascend the gondola to Mount Cavendish for a terrific panorama of both Christchurch and Lyttelton as well as a stunning coastal landscape of precipitous cliffs and pebbly bays. While in the Port Hills, take advantage of numerous trails leading to overlooks including Godley Head, site of a WWII battery. In the Christchurch Botanic Gardens, a beloved city landmark since 1863, walk through exquisite grounds showcasing colorful flowers, native trees and glass conservatories. Glide over the Avon River on a boat guided by a punter in Edwardian attire, a wonderful conveyance in which to absorb the bucolic scenery. At the Riccarton House, immerse yourself further in the graceful Edwardian and Victorian eras while touring a sumptuous estate and its grounds. Back in Lyttelton, visit the Timeball Station, a castle-like building designed to keep Greenwich Mean Time that was destroyed by the earthquake and recently rebuilt, a testament to the inspiring tenacity of the Kiwis.

  • Picton

    Sail into the breathtaking Marlborough Sounds, irregular mountainous valleys that were overtaken by the sea around 10,000 years ago, and alight in the wonderful port of Picton. Nestled in a snug bay hugged by tree-covered peaks, this breezy town is set in one of the most picturesque locations in New Zealand. Kayak along the stunning coastline, weaving in and out of cozy bays lined with dense vegetation, perhaps catching sight of playful dolphins and orcas skimming past. The underwater wreck of the Russian cruise ship MS Mikhail Lermontov, which sank in 1986, provides the unique opportunity to dive into the remains of a modern vessel. Bike or trek a portion of the outstanding Queen Charlotte Track, a 44-mile path that winds through temperate rainforests and rewards hikers with spectacular views of the surrounding waterways. Aircraft enthusiasts will appreciate the Omaka Aviation Heritage Center, an incredible collection of WWI and WWII aircraft owned by acclaimed director Peter Jackson, best known for his Lord of the Rings film trilogy. Of course, no visit to the Marlborough region is complete without experiencing its world-class sauvignon blanc, which you can sample during an enjoyable tour of a celebrated winery.

  • Nelson

    Settled in 1841 by the British New Zealand Company, early colonists named the burgeoning city after revered war hero Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson. Over time, Nelson has acquired an offbeat artistic vibe, which culminates in the yearly Wearable Art Festival. See the best of these extravagant costumes at the World of Wearable Art & Classic Cars Museum, which also displays superb examples of vintage automobiles. The city is peppered with serene green spaces, from the enchanting footbridges and sculptures of the Queen’s Gardens to the charming bonsai and shrines of the Miyazu Japanese Gardens. Tahunanui Beach is a wide stretch of soft sand ideal for swimming, strolling and enjoying lovely views of the expansive bay. Grab a paddle and kayak to Nelson Haven, a tranquil bay protected by a narrow spit of rocky land punctuated with a picturesque lighthouse. A bit to the north, the Abel Tasman National Park Coast Track leads hikers through the rainforest and past crescent coves at the foot of richly wooded hills. If you choose to stay in town, a plethora of appealing shops, boutiques and cafes fill the storefronts, including cheerful pubs serving the region’s much touted craft beers.

  • At Sea

  • Dusky Sound

    Split into multiple channels by dozens of lushly forested islands, Dusky Sound offers a sublime array of vistas around every turn in the waterway. Part of New Zealand’s Fiordland National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site, the sound’s wide mouth narrows as you navigate further inland, with majestic, snow-tipped mountains closing in on either side. Careening off sheer cliffs, roaring waterfalls, sometimes numbering in the hundreds, spill countless gallons into the inky fjord. Approach the shoreline in a kayak, perhaps discovering a bounty of delicious mussels or a waddling colony of fur seals. Dusky Sound is a remote, rarely visited section of the national park, making it a superb environment for the region’s wildlife to flourish in pristine conditions. Among the striking native birds, you might see South Island saddlebacks, mohuas and the delightful Fiordland crested penguin, with twin yellow stripes atop its head. Astounding creatures such as humpback and southern right wales swim through these waters, often accompanied by bottlenose dolphins. As you explore this ravishing realm, you’ll soon find yourself becoming one with nature.

  • Milford Sound

    When Rudyard Kipling navigated this breathtaking fjord in 1891, he declared it “the eighth wonder of the world.” Such a well-travelled man would surely know, and you’ll likely find yourself heartily agreeing. In Maori, this UNESCO World Heritage-listed region is known as Te Wahipounamu, which translates to the place of greenstone, although the vivid greens are mostly provided by the lush forests blanketing the granite peaks. These majestic mountains, which closely hug the sound, rise dramatically at steep angles and are frequently capped with virgin snow. Plunging waterfalls add to the spectacular panorama, with Lady Bowen Falls cascading 532 feet into the indigo waters below. Look to the sound’s surface for the appearance of fur seals, bottlenose dolphins, southern right whales and humpback whales, awe-inspiring creatures that thrive in this nutrient-rich environment. In the incredible Milford Sound Underwater Observatory, stay dry while viewing a teeming subaquatic world 33 feet beneath the surface. Hop into a kayak for an up-close exploration of the rocky shoreline and come across nesting grounds of the Fiordland crested penguin, whose vibrant blond crests are another fabulous highlight of stunningly beautiful Milford Sound.

  • Hobart, Tasmania

    Like many of Australia’s oldest cities, Hobart originated as a penal colony, but today is the country’s gateway to Antarctica because of its advantageous position in southern Tasmania. The city’s rich heritage is on full display at the elegant 1830s sandstone buildings of Salamanca Place, a bustling gathering place brimming with cafes, boutiques and galleries. Immerse yourself further in history at Port Arthur, a UNESCO World Heritage site for its remarkably preserved 19th-century convict facilities, including a penitentiary, hospital and church. Ascend 4,200-foot-tall Mount Wellington on foot, bike or horseback for incredible views over the surrounding landscape and see Tasmania’s unique creatures in the wild, or interact with koalas, kangaroos, wallabies and Tasmanian devils at the Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary. At the thought-provoking Museum of Old and New Art, engage your artistic sensibilities as you study acclaimed, cutting edge exhibits, and see a more genteel side of Hobart among the historic homes of the Battery Point district. Round out your perfect day with a taste of Tasmanian beer at the Cascade Brewery Company, which is housed in a stunning 1824 building and has the distinction of being Australia’s oldest operating brewery.

  • Wineglass Bay

    The curiously shaped Freycinet Peninsula, which zigs and zags its way south, is a geographic treasure trove of picture-perfect settings. Even in this preternaturally beautiful place, Wineglass Bay stands out with its perfect sandy crescent and waters that gently transition from surfside teal to deep sapphire. Rising on each side, boulder-strewn pink granite mountains provide a glorious backdrop and outstanding opportunities for exploration. Just to the north, the five peaks known as The Hazards can be hiked along a loop that takes you past postcard-ready lookouts over the bay. During your wanderings, you might catch sight of the peninsula’s abundant wildlife, with includes wallabies, wombats, quolls and Tasmanian devils. It might be difficult to pull yourself away from the beach itself, however, as it is consistently rated among the top ten in the world. Dig your toes into the sugar-white sand, float in the crystalline water or just take in the miraculous panorama. If you crave civilization, a scenic walk brings you to the Freycinet Lodge, where you can sit on a terrace with views over Coles Bay and sip on – need we say it? – a glass of wine.

  • Flinders Island

    Hovering just off the north coast of Tasmania, Flinders Island is the largest landmass in the Furneaux Archipelago, a sparsely inhabited place once primarily occupied by fur seals. The picturesque granite peaks of the Darling Range slice the sky, offering terrific hiking opportunities through aromatic eucalyptus forests. Mount Strzelecki presents the biggest challenge but the greatest reward, with sweeping views of the entire island and even a glimpse of Tasmania on the clearest days. In the Patriarchs Wildlife Sanctuary, catch sight of quintessentially Australian creatures such as wallabies and wombats, and perhaps help to feed their young. Uncover the island’s turbulent history at the Furneaux Museum, where highlights include artifacts recovered from shipwrecks, and at the Wybalenna Chapel, final resting site of the island’s Aborigines. Gather faux diamonds, in fact translucent topaz, during a stroll on marvelous Killiecrankie Bay, and dip your toes into the water at any of dozens of beaches, where the only footsteps in the sand are likely to be your own. Walk to the edge of Trousers Point and admire the massive boulders, many of which are highlighted by bright-orange lichen. On spellbinding Flinders Island, feeling like the last person on Earth has never seemed so wonderful.

  • Sydney

    Glide into Sydney past the iconic silhouette of the Opera House, a bravura architectural statement recognizable the world over. If you can’t catch a performance in this UNESCO World Heritage site, take a tour of the equally astonishing interior. Soak up the sun on see-and-be-seen Bondi Beach and stroll along the Coogee Coastal Walk past several cozy beaches and rugged coastal scenery. At the venerable Royal Botanic Gardens, founded in 1816, delight in a dazzling variety of vegetation with the glittering harbor as a backdrop. Stroll along cobblestone lanes at The Rocks, Sydney’s first neighborhood and a wonderful assortment of historic buildings transformed into galleries, shops and bistros. Shed light on Australia’s origins as a penal colony at two UNESCO World Heritage sites, the enlightening Hyde Parks Barracks Museum and Cockatoo Island, which is reachable via vista-filled ferry ride. For a remarkable window into life in the 1830s, wander the house and gardens of the Elizabeth Farm, the country’s oldest homestead. Soar like a bird over the city on a seaplane tour or perch like one atop the Tower Eye, the highest observation platform in Sydney. At Circular Quay, sate your appetite at one of the world-class restaurants housed in this culinary hub while enjoying magnificent harbor views.


Suites & Staterooms

Heyerdahl Suite

From: $ 40,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Eriksson Suite

From: $ 40,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Amundsen Suite

From: $ 29,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Sverdrup Suite

From: $ 28,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Archer Suite

From: $ 28,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Nansen Suite

From: $ 26,999*

Only 1 Remaining

Large Suite with Balcony Deck 7

From: $ 21,999*

Suite with Balcony Deck 7

From: $ 17,299*

Suite with Balcony Deck 6

From: $ 16,999*

Suite with Balcony Deck 5

From: $ 16,799*

Suite with Oceanview

From: $ 13,999*

*Government, Port, Document Issuance, Handling & Service fees: $900 per guest



Please Note: Fares are capacity controlled and may change without notice. The fares are per person based on double occupancy. Single and third person rates are also available. SeaDream Yacht Club strongly recommends that all guests purchase travel insurance.


Yachting Land Adventures & Activities

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Prices are per person, in USD. Duration is in hours.


Testimonials

The ship is amazing but the icing on the cake was the wonderful staff. Mr & Mrs Richard SouthonBucks, Great Britain
Exceptional food. Interesting menu options. A delight every lunch & dinner. Mrs Lydia Watson PinneyMidland, Michigan