London (Greenwich) to Ushuaia

London (Greenwich) to Ushuaia

Sep 18, 2021 to Nov 27, 2021

70 Days

SeaDream Innovation

G32101

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Sep 18, 2021 London (Greenwich),
United Kingdom
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Overnight
Sep 19, 2021 London (Greenwich),
United Kingdom
Afternoon
Sep 20, 2021 Guernsey, Channel Islands,
United Kingdom
Morning Evening
Sep 21, 2021 At Sea,
Sep 22, 2021 A Coruna (Spain),
Spain
Morning Evening
Sep 23, 2021 At Sea,
Sep 24, 2021 At Sea,
Sep 25, 2021 Ponta Delgada, Azores,
Portugal
Morning Evening
Sep 26, 2021 Horta, Azores,
Portugal
Morning Evening
Sep 27, 2021 At Sea,
Sep 28, 2021 At Sea,
Sep 29, 2021 At Sea,
Sep 30, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 01, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 02, 2021 Hamilton,
Bermuda
Morning Evening
Oct 03, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 04, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 05, 2021 Bimini,
Bahamas
Morning Evening
Oct 06, 2021 Miami, USA,
United States
Morning Overnight
Oct 07, 2021 Miami, USA,
United States
Overnight
Oct 08, 2021 Miami, USA,
United States
Evening
Oct 09, 2021 Key West,
United States
Morning Late Evening
Oct 10, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 11, 2021 Costa Maya,
Mexico
Morning Evening
Oct 12, 2021 Belize City,
Belize
Morning Evening
Oct 13, 2021 Half Moon Cay/Lighthouse Reef,
Belize
Morning Evening
Oct 14, 2021 Bay Islands/Cayos Cochinos,
Honduras
Morning Evening
Oct 15, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 16, 2021 Providencia,
Colombia
Morning Evening
Oct 17, 2021 Puerto Limón,
Costa Rica
Morning Evening
Oct 18, 2021 Bocas del Toro,
Panama
Morning Evening
Oct 19, 2021 Fort San Lorenzo,
Panama
Morning Evening
Oct 20, 2021 Panama Canal transit,
Panama
Morning Evening
Oct 21, 2021 Fuerte Amador (Panama City),
Panama
Morning Evening
Oct 22, 2021 Playa Muerto,
Panama
Morning Evening
Oct 23, 2021 Puerto Utría,
Colombia
Morning Evening
Oct 24, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 25, 2021 Manta/Isla de la Plata,
Ecuador
Morning Evening
Oct 26, 2021 At Sea,
Oct 27, 2021 Trujillo,
Peru
Morning Evening
Oct 28, 2021 Callao (Lima),
Peru
Morning Overnight
Oct 29, 2021 Callao (Lima),
Peru
Evening
Oct 30, 2021 Pisco,
Peru
Morning Evening
Oct 31, 2021 At Sea,
Nov 01, 2021 Iquique,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 02, 2021 Antofagasta,
Chile
Afternoon Afternoon
Nov 03, 2021 At Sea,
Nov 04, 2021 Coquimbo/La Serena,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 05, 2021 Valparaíso,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 06, 2021 At Sea,
Nov 07, 2021 At Sea,
Nov 08, 2021 Castro, Chile,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 09, 2021 Puyuhuapi,
Chile
Morning Afternoon
Nov 10, 2021 English Narrows,
Chile
Afternoon Evening
Nov 11, 2021 Puerto Eden,
Chile
Afternoon Evening
Nov 12, 2021 Exploration Day Morning Evening
Nov 13, 2021 Punta Arenas,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 14, 2021 Glacier Alley,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 15, 2021 Cape Horn,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 16, 2021 Ushuaia,
Argentina
Morning Evening
Nov 17, 2021 At Sea,
Nov 18, 2021 South Shetland Islands *,
Antarctica
Morning Evening
Nov 19, 2021 Antarctic Sound & Weddell Sea *,
Antarctica
Morning Overnight
Nov 20, 2021 Antarctic Sound & Weddell Sea *,
Antarctica
Evening
Nov 21, 2021 Deception Island *,
Antarctica
Morning Evening
Nov 22, 2021 Cuverville Island & Danco Island *,
Antarctica
Morning Evening
Nov 23, 2021 Lemaire Channel & Petermann Island*,
Antarctica
Morning Evening
Nov 24, 2021 Paradise Bay & Neko Harbour *,
Antarctica
Morning Evening
Nov 25, 2021 At Sea,
Nov 26, 2021 Cape Horn,
Chile
Morning Evening
Nov 27, 2021 Ushuaia,
Argentina
8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • London (Greenwich)

    Synonymous with royalty, London is a living testament to the lofty achievements of the mighty kings and queens that have presided over this storied island nation. Witness the changing of the guard at gracious Buckingham Palace, a cherished custom that is both timeless and precisely on time, and tour the Houses of Parliament, the city’s other magnificently ornate center of power and a UNESCO World Heritage site. Cross the iconic Tower Bridge on your way to view the utterly dazzling Crown Jewels, which are kept in the once-forbidding Tower of London, another UNESCO site. After refreshing with a pint of beer at a classic English pub, sample the best of contemporary art at the essential Tate Modern, which is housed in a former brick power station. Next door, you’ll find the faithful reconstruction of Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, where Romeo and Juliet can keep falling in love for eternity. Stroll through immaculately manicured Hyde Park, shop in tony Covent Garden and take in the entire city from the London Eye observation wheel, as the resonant chimes of Big Ben comfort both Londoners and visitors with time-honored tones known the world over.

  • Guernsey, Channel Islands

    Boasting an immensely picturesque coastline, the Channel Island of Guernsey has long attracted artists such as Auguste Renoir to its welcoming shores. In the capital of St. Peter Port, wander through commanding Castle Cornet, a 13th-century marvel of military engineering that sits on a rocky headland jutting out at sea. Admire some of the earliest heated glass houses at the Candie Gardens, whose elegantly landscaped grounds are laid out with Victorian thoughtfulness and contemplate Victor Hugo’s not entirely uncomfortable exile at Hauteville House, the splendid manor where he wrote Les Miserables. Hop on a bicycle to explore the picturesque hills and dales of the island, perhaps riding past a herd of the island’s famed namesake cows, and revitalize at an authentic tea house, where age-old traditions are carefully observed. For that perfect keepsake, shop along cobbled streets overflowing with charm, maybe pausing at a fresh-caught seafood restaurant for a taste of the island’s famed crab. No matter how you choose to spend your time, the leisurely pace of life in delightful Guernsey will replenish your spirit.

  • At Sea

  • A Coruna (Spain)

  • Ponta Delgada, Azores

    Marvel at the natural gifts of São Miguel Island, a spectacular Azorean island shaped by volcanic activity and carpeted from shore to shore with lush vegetation. At the Lagoa das Sete Cidades’s twin lakes, uncover the romantic tale of a star-crossed couple, a princess and a shepherd, whose tears of heartbreak created the two adjoining yet differently hued lakes, each the color of one of the lover’s eyes. Stroll among stately Baroque buildings in marvelous Ribeira Grande, and then ascend to Pico do Carvão for glorious views of the entire island. While traveling through São Miguel’s verdant valleys, you might taste the bounty of the island at a flourishing pineapple or tea plantation, or for a more exhilarating experience seek out the spouting geysers and hot springs that dot the Furnas Valley. Go off the beaten track on a 4x4 vehicle through the stunning Serra de Água de Pau mountain range, reveling in picture-perfect vistas of the shimmering Lagoa do Fogo, or Fire Lake. From its dramatic shoreline to its soaring peaks, São Miguel Island never ceases to astonish.

  • Horta, Azores

    Somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean, far from civilization, the luxuriously green archipelago of the Azores emerges from the sea like shards of paradise that splintered from the heavens above. While each of the Azores is volcanically formed, Faial Island boasts one of the most dramatic calderas, whose mile-wide depression is ringed by precipitous cliffs. From the Espalamanca Overlook, absorb a magnificent panorama of Horta and the picturesque coastline, perhaps even catching sight of the neighboring islands of Pico, São Jorge and Graciosa. While exploring, keep an eye out for brightly hued blue hydrangeas, a frequent sight that gave rise to Faial’s affectionate nickname of Blue Island. On the island’s starkly beautiful westernmost tip, you’ll find a lighthouse that survived a volcanic eruption and found itself further inland after the lava flow had solidified. Set off on a seagoing exploration to view majestic whales, which abound in the nutrient-rich Azorean waters, and at the fascinating Scrimshaw Museum, examine whale’s teeth that were intricately carved by local fishermen during long voyages. You might encounter some of these hardy folk at Peter Café Sport, a buoyant local institution famed for its sailing memorabilia and invigorating gin and tonics.

  • Hamilton

    An airier version of the United Kingdom endowed with tropical flair, the Bermudan archipelago holds a surprising number of compelling attractions across its minuscule landmass. In the UNESCO World Heritage site town of St. George’s, wander cobblestone streets steeped in colonial history, perhaps pausing at the quaint 17th-century St. Peter’s Church, the oldest Anglican house of worship outside of England. Be sure to take a stroll along one of Bermuda’s renowned pink sand beaches, the result of crushed red shells mingling with sand to astonishing effect. More wonders await below ground at the Crystal and Fantasy Caves, which were carved out and shaped for millions of years, creating spectacular rock formations that surround azure underground lakes. For dramatic contrast, climb the soaring Gibbs Hill Lighthouse, Bermuda’s tallest structure and one of the world’s oldest cast iron beacons, and take in 360-degree views of the entire archipelago. At the Royal Navy Dockyard, a stately collection of 19th-century maritime buildings, you might pick up a memento of alluring Bermuda from the enticing array of shops housed within.

  • Bimini

    Bimini may be the smallest island in the Bahamas, but it’s big in pleasures. Boasting some of the bluest turquoise waters in the Caribbean, this jewel is a mere 50 miles east of Miami and was once home to writer Ernest Hemingway, who extolled the island in his writings. Plunge into the island’s crystal-clear shallows for some of the most exciting scuba adventures in the Bahamas. In fins and a snorkel, even beginners can explore shipwrecks like the Sapona amid throngs of brilliantly colored reef fish. Back on land, browse the unique Dolphin House, a museum built using only recycled, salvaged and donated materials. For novel Bahamian souvenirs you won’t find anywhere else, don’t miss out on their gift shop. Feast on cracked conch and a refreshing rum punch on Radio Beach, named one of the best sandy stretches in the Bahamas as it has managed to preserve its small-town charm. Wade into placid, aquamarine waters that deepen slowly, making it feel like you could wander out for miles. Whether you’re on land, sand or in the water, you’ll feel rejuvenated by ravishing Bimini.

  • Miami, USA

    Few places in the world linger in the popular imagination like free-spirited Miami, a dynamic city that manages to feel refreshingly Caribbean yet unequivocally American. Glimpse the ebullient Cuban way of life in Little Havana, where locals sip potent coffee as the sounds of salsa punctuate the sultry air. At seaside Vizcaya House & Gardens, wander through a spectacularly appointed Gilded Age manor and its adjacent gardens, all styled to evoke a Venetian palazzo that even boasts an offshore ship carved out of coral rock. Art lovers will be impressed by the Perez Art Museum Miami, whose stunning, environmentally-minded building is as appealing as the world-class collection of contemporary art housed inside. A more primal experience awaits at Everglades National Park, where a thrilling ride aboard an airboat over an endless sea of grass reveals the area’s most notorious resident, the enigmatic American alligator. In jet-setting Miami Beach, see and be seen as you stroll beside the art deco jewels lining iconic Ocean Drive, which becomes awash in a mesmerizing blur of multihued neon and jubilant revelers after sunset.

  • Key West

    Revel in the many charms of Key West, the southernmost city in the continental United States and a quirky retreat brimming with attractions. Absorb the festive atmosphere of colorful Duval Street before turning off on any side street, where you’ll come across the island’s lovingly maintained Victorian homes. At the Ernest Hemingway House, learn about the legendary author’s love affair with the town and delight in the six-toed cats roaming about, descendants of Hemingway’s own felines, and at the Harry S. Truman Little White House tour the lovely winter escape of the 33rd president. Browse artifacts recovered from the bottom of the sea at the Key West Shipwreck Museum or dive beneath the waves to explore a sunken vessel for yourself. For a fantastic aerial view of these undersea ghosts, book a helicopter ride and discover you can see right to the bottom of the transparent waters. Ascend the 88 steps of the Key West Lighthouse and learn about Barbara Mabrity, the spirited 19th-century woman who oversaw the beacon for almost 40 years, and rejoice in 360-degree views of the carefree island.

  • Costa Maya

    Although primarily renowned for its tranquil, crystal-clear waters, the popular Caribbean port of Costa Maya offers much more than first meets the eye. It is the gateway to three awe-inspiring Mayan ceremonial sites, Chaccoben, Kohunlich and Dzibanche, all boasting remarkably well-preserved stone pyramids that rise above the canopy as well as other intriguing ruins picturesquely woven into the fabric of the jungle. For further immersion into Mayan spiritualism, participate in a purification ritual with the guidance of a local shaman, who is dedicated to soothing both your body and soul. Find utter serenity at the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve, a vast UNESCO World Heritage site of aquamarine waters, mangrove mazes, salty marshes and countless native species. Offshore, snorkel or dive in the world’s second-largest coral reef, an entrancing display of brightly hued tropical fish darting to and fro. You might choose to skim over this sensational setting on a catamaran, enjoying the glorious panorama while soaking up the sun’s rays. However, you needn’t leave the port for a dazzling array of activities, from thrilling dune buggy rides to bustling bars and restaurants full of friendly travelers.

  • Belize City

    Experience the captivating history, culture and natural wonders of Belize, starting out from Belize City. Explore the venerable Mayan ruins of Lamanai, nestled in the thick of the jungle, and venture back in time more than three millennia as you take in a trio of remarkably preserved stone step-pyramid structures. Ascend the ancient steps of High Temple to 108 feet off the ground for unparalleled views across the jungle canopy, a sea of lush foliage stretching as far as the eye can see. At the foot of the Maya Mountains, take in the spectacular waterfalls, mountain vistas and abundant wildlife of Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary, where jaguars still roam. Go for a hike, birdwatching expedition or a swim in rejuvenating river waters. For a slower-paced adventure from Belize City, board a water taxi to Caye Caulker, a haven of white sand and cerulean waters. Order a bucket of Belikins on the beach, the light and refreshing national beer of Belize, and pick up a handcrafted, inspiring piece of local art before you leave, a keepsake memory of this enchanting country.

  • Half Moon Cay/Lighthouse Reef

    Bask in the stunningly clear waters and pristine white-sand beaches of Half Moon Caye, home to some of the world’s most exquisite and unblemished natural wonders. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage site, the island is a safe haven for fragile, spectacularly beautiful marine and wildlife, including the red-footed booby bird and magnificent frigate bird. Explore Half Moon Caye Wall, considered by many to be the best dive site in Belize, with gentle conditions and dependable wildlife encounters, including majestic sea turtles, awe-inspiring eagle rays, hypnotically entrancing garden eels and lavish, brilliantly-colored sponge formations. The surrounding Lighthouse Reef, also a UNESCO site, is one of the best developed and healthiest reefs in the Caribbean. Feast your eyes on the immensely picturesque Great Blue Hole, where aquamarine waters suddenly plunge to a depth of more than 400 feet in a dazzling, eye-popping ultramarine blue in which bull sharks and hammerheads are sometimes spotted. For adventurers seeking the ultimate first-hand experience with the natural splendors and vibrant colors of the Caribbean, Half Moon Caye and Lighthouse Reef are can’t-miss treasures.

  • Bay Islands/Cayos Cochinos

    Blessed with a privileged location within the world’s second-largest barrier reef, the unspoiled Bay Islands are a prized mecca for divers and snorkelers from near and far. As you dip beneath the crystalline water’s surface, you’ll come face to face with a glorious underwater realm populated by fantastically formed corals and the vibrantly colored tropical fish that dart among them. For a different kind of rush, soar through the jungle canopy on a zipline for a bird’s eye perspective of the lush landscape below. In the island of Roatán’s bohemian West End Village, amble down sandy pathways lined with enticing eateries and cozy shops displaying local arts and crafts. Sun-lovers rejoice, as the Bay Islands are rimmed by long stretches of inviting powdery beaches, many considered among the most beautiful found anywhere. And to truly get away from it all, make your way to the Cayos Cochinos, pristine islets where the cares of the world float away on the gentle sea breezes.

  • Providencia

    You’ll find yourself genuinely off the beaten path in petite Providencia, a nearly inaccessible island paradise that epitomizes Caribbean charm. Although technically part of Colombia, the isle lies much closer to Nicaragua and was once a British Colony, which has imbued it with its own distinctive Creole flair. It almost goes without saying that Providencia’s top draw are the stellar beaches, all boasting fine sand and inviting crystal-clear waters. Hop on a kayak and explore McBean Lagoon National Park, which is home to rays, sea turtles and a host of other exotic species, some of which are endangered. Should you happen to be visiting on a Saturday, you won’t want to miss the sight of horses whipping up the surf and sand as they race along the beach at South West Bay, a truly exhilarating event. But no matter when you’re visiting, you can hike to the fort ruins on adjacent Santa Catalina Island for incredible views and the chance to examine the remaining British cannons. As you can imagine, in tiny Providencia everyone’s considered a friend, so head out and forge some new bonds at renowned Roland’s Reggae Beach Bar or at any of the island’s excellent shoreside restaurants.

  • Puerto Limón

    Uncover the natural gifts of the often-overlooked Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, one of the most ecologically diverse places in the world. Venture into the Tortuguero Canal, which has been dubbed “The Amazon of Costa Rica” for its densely forested shores and abundance of exotic wildlife such as howler, spider and white-faced capuchin monkeys as well as endangered turtles and myriad other creatures. For an up-close encounter with nature, visit the Sloth Sanctuary and capture memorable photos of these gentle and slow-moving arboreal residents. Dial up the thrill level with a heart-pounding zipline ride through the jungle canopy of the Veragua Rainforest, a unique opportunity to see the world from the point of view of a great green macaw. If you prefer a more relaxing experience, you can also ascend to the canopy in an open-air aerial tram as iridescent butterflies dance around you. And for an authentic taste of Costa Rica, sample the bountiful riches of the land at Hacienda Tayutic, where sugarcane, coffee and macadamia nuts are still harvested and processed using age-old methods.

  • Bocas del Toro

    Just off the northwestern shore of mainland Panama, a gorgeous chain of islands offers a welcome respite from more crowded Caribbean destinations. Among the many idyllic stretches of sand and sea, a particular standout is Starfish Beach, which is populated by a thriving community of its namesake creatures, a truly wondrous sight. Yet more marvels await beneath the waves, as the waters are teeming with a kaleidoscope of coral, tropical fish and majestic sea turtles that contribute to this area’s reputation as “The Galápagos of the Caribbean.” You’ll discover that a horseback ride is one of the best ways to take in verdant Bocas del Toro, whether you’re trotting on a tranquil beach or taking in sweeping panoramas from a rainforest mountain clearing. Savor the differences among a dozen species of bananas at the lush Finca Los Monos Botanical Garden and connect with the indigenous Ngobe community at the Oreba chocolate farm, where the sweetness of their cacao products is matched only by that of the Panamanian people.

  • Fort San Lorenzo

    Awake your inner adventurer at Fort San Lorenzo, a UNESCO World Heritage site honored as an outstanding example of 18th-century military architecture. Perched atop a promontory overlooking the Caribbean Sea and the mouth of the Chagres River, the fort provided its Spanish defenders invaluable sightlines across the shimmering waters. You’ll enjoy the same sweeping vistas as you wander among the photogenic remains of crumbling towers and ramparts lined with ancient cannons, once used to fend off the assaults of fearsome privateers such as Sir Henry Morgan. Just beyond the fort lies the verdant San Lorenzo Protected Forest, whose winding trails lead through a nearly undisturbed jungle of vine-tangled trees. Keep an eye out for vibrant toucans, howler monkeys, lazy iguanas and a plethora of exotic plants, including several varieties of alluring orchids and dazzling heliconias. After your enlightening exploration, unwind on a tucked away beach at the edge of the park, a marvelous setting in which to contemplate Panama’s splendor.

  • Panama Canal transit

  • Fuerte Amador (Panama City)

    Step ashore at Fuerte Amador, the lush hideaway of notorious 17th-century pirates like fearsome Captain Henry Morgan. Marvel at the awe-inspiring Panama Canal, one of the seven modern wonders of the world, and survey this feat of engineering from the observation decks of the Miraflores Locks as commanding freighter ships glide past on their sojourn between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Explore the enchanting 16th-century ruins of Panama Viejo, just east of the canal, the oldest European settlement on the Pacific coast of the Americas and a celebrated UNESCO World Heritage site. Wander the stone-paved streets of Casco Viejo, Panama City’s most charismatic quarter, also a UNESCO World Heritage site for its remarkable architecture and eclectic collision of Caribbean, Spanish, French and early American styles. Admire the Frank Gehry-designed Biomuseo, dedicated to the storied natural history of Panama, and delight in fresh, locally-prepared ceviche, a Panamanian favorite, at the Mercado de Mariscos fish market. From modern marvels to walkable history, seafood delights to world-class architecture, you’ll return from your adventures replenished and ready for more.

  • Playa Muerto

    Nestled in one of the least inhabited but most beautiful corners of the world lies the modest seaside village of Playa Muerto, a place where modernity has barely made a dent and the local tribes live untarnished by the trappings of civilization. Surrounded by the vast Darién National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site boasting an immense variety of ecosystems critical to the environmental health of Central America, this gem of a hamlet is only reachable by winding footpaths or by boat. After making your way to the quaint thatched-roof huts near the beach, you’ll find the Emberá Indian tribe, the only permanent residents of this remote arcadia. In this arresting setting, you can share in a hearty meal of freshly caught fish and lobster, and if you wish to support the friendly locals, consider purchasing their beautiful handicrafts, which include wood carvings, beaded jewelry and intricately woven baskets that can take months to create. This extraordinary sojourn at the rim of an endless jungle is sure to be a memory you’ll cherish for years to come.

  • Puerto Utría

    You’ll find Puerto Utría near the tip of a densely forested peninsula that juts out from primeval Utría National Park. Miles away from the nearest town of any consequence, you’ll feel as if the entire breathtaking landscape was conjured just for you. Strolling through the lush jungle, it’s possible to spot a dazzling array of exotic creatures including mantled howler monkeys, black-headed spider monkeys, brown-throated sloths, jaguars and countless other species including around 380 varieties of birds. The area’s terrific beaches offer the ultimate getaway but are also crucial nesting grounds for the gentle olive ridley sea turtle. Offshore, the diversity is just as striking, as the coastline is rimmed by coral reefs that teem with an incredible array of marine creatures. Be on the lookout for playful bottlenose dolphins leaping through the waves, and if you’re visiting during whale-watching season, you might catch sight of these magnificent creatures gracefully breaching the surface of the sea. Allow the full majesty of nature unfold before you in extraordinary Puerto Utría.

  • Manta/Isla de la Plata

    Skim across royal blue waters on an epic journey alongside leaping dolphins and, from June to December, magnificently breaching humpback whales bound for an uncommon island retreat 25 miles off the shores of Ecuador. Spot sea lions basking in the sun as you set foot on Isla de la Plata, or Silver Island, legendarily named for a hoard of silver stashed on its verdant shores by famed explorer and privateer Sir Francis Drake. Set out on one of several paths that crisscross the island, marked for the casual or more avid hiker, into a veritable bird-lover’s paradise. Among a vast array of blue-footed booby birds and frigate birds as well as an incredible variety of tropical vegetation, it is easy to imagine you’ve been transported to the extravagance of the Galápagos. Explore the island’s remarkable craggy cliffs, with dramatic, sheer drops to the sapphire sea below. Plunge into warm waters for a shoulder-to-shoulder swim with majestic sea turtles and snorkel amid bleached coral and schools of tropical fish in a range of bold, eye-popping colors.

  • Trujillo

    Although the area prospered under the enigmatic Chimu and Moche civilizations, splendid Trujillo flourished once again under Spanish colonial rule. Not far from the city center, you’ll discover the world’s largest pre-Columbian adobe city, Chan Chan, a place of such cultural importance it has been deemed a UNESCO World Heritage site. It is rivaled in magnificence by the Temples of the Sun and Moon, remains of once towering pyramids where you can examine fascinating painted reliefs that depict fantastical creatures and scenes from Moche society. In the center of the city, you’ll discern the legacy of the conquistadors in the numerous elegant and vividly hued buildings they constructed. Most noteworthy is the Trujillo Cathedral, a baroque delight with a striking mustard-yellow exterior, but you can also glimpse how the élite once lived on a visit to a casona, one of the city’s beautifully maintained historic mansions. And while you’re in town, you must try a ceviche, Perú’s quintessential gastronomic calling card.

  • Callao (Lima)

    Stroll down avenues exuding Spanish colonial grandeur as you explore Lima, a resplendent city founded in 1535 by conquistador Francisco Pizarro. View the gilded tomb containing his remains in the sublime Lima Cathedral, whose façade showcases a pleasing mélange of styles beneath two elegant bell towers. You’ll delight in the marvelous Baroque details of the Basilica and Convent of San Francisco, acclaimed for its intricate red, white and gold interior. In the famed Gold Museum, behold innumerable examples of the gleaming riches so intensely coveted by Spain. Step back through the centuries at the Temple of Pachacamac, at one time the Peruvian Coast’s most important Inca ceremonial site. Overlooking the shimmering Pacific Ocean, walk down precisely arranged lanes once trod by reclusive high priests and sacred maidens. In Lima’s upscale Miraflores district, discover enticing artisan markets offering handcrafted goods, including the brightly hued and geometrically patterned textiles Peru is renowned for. No matter where you are in the city, you’ll always feel heartened by the engaging warmth of the Peruvian people.

  • Pisco

    As its name suggests, Pisco is the epicenter of the country’s signature libation, a brandy-like spirit concocted by Spanish settlers in the 16th century. A quick jaunt inland will bring you to vineyard country, a landscape peppered with stately haciendas where you can sample first-rate pisco and Peru’s increasingly celebrated wines. While outside the city, you might stop at the wonderfully preserved remains of Tambo Colorado, a magnificent Inca administrative complex constructed entirely from adobe. You’ll marvel at the visible vestiges of painted murals, a reminder that the site once used to be brilliantly colored. Even further afield lie the legendary Nazca Lines, a UNESCO World Heritage site composed of immense carved geoglyphs that portray animals, plants and abstract shapes. For a privileged close-up view, hop on a touring airplane and fly over these mysterious depictions, whose significance continues to puzzle experts to this day. An encounter with flamingos, seals, penguins and countless other marine creatures awaits on the stark islands and shores of the Paracas National Reserve, a dramatic, barren landscape carved out by wind and sea. Conclude your stimulating day in bustling Plaza de Armas with a glass of pisco, toasting the hypnotic allure of this spellbinding region.

  • Iquique

    Defying the forbidding clime of the Atacama Desert, the exuberant city of Iquique has grown into one of Chile’s major economic engines. In expansive Plaza Arturo Prat, admire the stately Municipal Theater and the attractive snow-white clock tower that rises from the square’s center. You can learn more about revered Chilean naval officer Arturo Prat while touring a fascinating replica of his ship Esmeralda, a 19th-century corvette that was sunk by the Peruvian navy in 1879, and later join the locals on palm-lined Playa Cavancha, a broad stretch of sand that is blessed with year-round warm weather. You’ll discover the hypnotic Atacama holds many secrets, including the mining ghost town of Humberstone, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Settled in the 1880s near saltpeter deposits, Humberstone thrived for a few decades before new technologies rendered the mine’s methods obsolete. As you wander the eerie but riveting facilities, you can hear echoes of the hundreds of workers that once toiled here. If your visit to the desert has ignited your thirst for adventure, you might try an exhilarating sandboard ride down a sandy slope or even dare to paraglide from Cerra Dragon, an enormous dune that overlooks shimmering Iquique.

  • Antofagasta

    A thriving city settled on the seemingly inhospitable landscape of the Atacama Desert, Antofagasta has greatly benefitted from the vast mineral deposits found in the surrounding area. Just up the coast, where mountains and sea have clashed for millennia, you’ll find La Portada National Monument, a graceful offshore arch shaped by erosion. Be sure to have your camera ready at Mano del Desierto, a striking sculpture of a hand emerging from an otherwise completely stark landscape, a stirring sight unlike any other. Witness the epitome of human engineering at the Paranal Observatory, one of the world’s largest conglomerations of telescopes dedicated to documenting the cosmos. As you tour the remarkable facility, you might feel as if you’re starring in a science fiction movie set on Mars. For a true sense of life in Antofagasta, take an afternoon stroll in graceful Plaza Colón, where you can mingle with locals as they chat in the shade of regal palm trees and the square’s charming clock tower.

  • Coquimbo/La Serena

    Cherished by Chileans as one of their country’s premier beachfront destinations, the twin cities of Coquimbo and La Serena boast impressively long stretches of sand. As you stroll beside the lapping waves, you can’t miss the Faro Monumental, a soaring red-and-white lighthouse that is the city’s signature landmark. Seek serenity in the Kokoro No Niwa Japanese Garden, which is the largest of its kind in South America and whose beautifully manicured grounds will transport you to the distant Asian island nation. Just off the coast to the north, the outstanding National Humboldt Penguin Reserve is dedicated to the preservation of these bewitching aquatic birds. You might also observe cantankerous sea lions lounging about, bottlenose dolphins cavorting in the water and any number of other beguiling creatures. Cap off your adventures with a tasting of Chilean pisco at a local distillery, where you might tour the vineyards before treating yourself to a classic pisco sour.

  • Valparaíso

    The cultural capital of Chile, dubbed the “Jewel of the Pacific,” is a bustling coastal city and alluring hillside port, colorful and poetic and lovingly worn, perfect for exploration on foot. Wander the warren of narrow streets of the Historic District, a UNESCO World Heritage site filled with churches, shops and brightly-colored homes, whose Victorian architecture adapts to the steep natural landscape. Throughout the city, marvel at some of the world’s best street art, bursts of blazing color demanding closer study. Hop aboard one of the city’s 15 funiculars, including one that ascends to the immensely photogenic Cerro Alegre neighborhood, packed with lively bars and restaurants, and enjoy outstanding panoramic views as you glide upward. Stop by La Sebastiana, the unique modernist home (and now museum) of Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo Neruda. At the Caleta Portales fish market, sample fresh-made ceviche and empanadas before a stroll along the seafoam-sapphire seas and sandy stretch of Playa Las Torpederas. The relaxed bohemian charms of Valparaíso will stay with you long after you’ve left the storied hillside of this picturesque port.

  • Castro, Chile

    Hidden in an inlet of the Chiloé Archipelago, the quaint town of Castro holds a bounty of unexpected surprises. You’ll be delighted by the palafitos, traditional wooden houses built over the water and supported by stilts, with each façade painted in a different vibrant color. The island boasts a number of wood-built churches that have been designated UNESCO World Heritage sites for their unique craftsmanship. In Castro, San Francisco Church is the grandest example, a pale-yellow confection with an astonishingly detailed wood interior. Just outside of town, the lush forests of the Chiloé National Park beckon with verdant trails, fabulous lookouts over the Pacific Ocean and an abundance of wildlife, which includes the pudu, the world’s smallest deer. Kayaking around the islands of the archipelago is another wonderful option, as the countless coves and waterways beg for exploration. On the island’s northwest tip, the Natural Heritage Site Islotes de Puñihuil provides refuge to both Magellanic and Humboldt penguins. And for a taste of Chiloé, try some delectable curanto, a dish of local seafood, meat and potatoes covered with leaves and steamed over hot coals.

  • Puyuhuapi

    After a fabulously scenic cruise along the full length of the stunning Puyuhuapi Fjord, you’ll arrive at the town bearing the same name, a cozy settlement founded by a group of Germans in 1935. Wandering the tidy streets, notice charming evidence of Puyuhuapi’s German roots in the shingled barns and steep-roofed buildings. The area’s main attraction, however, is magnificent Queulat National Park, home to the incredible Hanging Glacier, which balances atop a precipitous cliff from where it releases a thundering cascade of melting ice. Just downstream, a Tiffany-blue lake fed by the glacier’s water only adds to the scene’s awe-inspiring atmosphere. You can reach this astonishing sight after a walk through the Enchanted Forest, a densely-packed woodland where glistening moss covers nearly every available surface, creating an otherworldly setting suffused in vivid greens. After a rewarding day of exploration, sink into Puyuhuapi’s Termas del Ventisquero, soothing hot springs that provide terrific views of the fjord. Should you desire a memento from this unforgettable village, visit the venerable Rug Factory, where woven carpets have been crafted using traditional methods since 1947.

  • English Narrows

    Even among the always magnificent passages of the Chilean Fjords, the English Narrows stand out for their especially glorious scenery. Whether you arrive from the Messier Channel to the north or from the Paso del Indio to the south, the waterway suddenly appears to close up, and the terrain fragments into dozens of tiny islands. You’ll discover passage is possible by weaving among the islets, the edges of the channel hugging closely at either side. In the forefront, densely forested hills reach to the water’s edge, while in the background snow-covered peaks loom over the exquisite setting. For millennia, the indigenous kawésqar people called this network of channels home, although only a few individuals remain today. Some reside in Villa Puerto Edén, a minute hamlet on the island of Wellington near the southern end of the narrows, a settlement known as one of the most isolated in Chile. As you sail, a pod of elusive Chilean dolphins may decide to accompany the ship, genial companions during this extraordinary chapter of your journey.

  • Puerto Eden

    Marvel at the nearly complete isolation of Puerto Edén, a remote village perched on Wellington Island, which is hidden deep within the labyrinth of the Chilean fjords and is the ancestral home of the indigenous Kawésqar people. The minuscule settlement, totaling under 200 inhabitants, means the island is short on amenities but lavishly endowed with pristine beauty. A scenic boardwalk connects the smattering of wood buildings, some of which tilt picturesquely at the whims of the wind. Follow the path up a number of steps for a breathtaking vista of the scenery that surrounds you, from the snow-covered peaks of the Andes to the fjord’s rocky shores. In the nutrient-rich waters, you might see a pod of Chilean dolphins, which are mostly gray and black but feature a striking white underside. A variety of resilient birds also call the region home, including striking blue-eyed cormorants, impressive southern giant petrels and the area’s most amusing residents, flightless steamer ducks. These orange-beaked creatures have very short wings and, when startled, will careen across the water furiously flapping their feathers. As you stand amid the island’s untrammeled, raw splendor, absorb the restorative stillness of this bewitching and faraway place.

  • Exploration Day

  • Punta Arenas

    Located on the legendary Strait of Magellan, this far-flung city reveals many unexpected pleasures. In Plaza Muñoz Gamero, you’ll be surrounded by stately mansions that wouldn’t seem out of place in Paris, Budapest or Madrid. Anchoring the square is a regal statue of Magellan himself, looking off into the distance in a suitably heroic manner. Immerse yourself in the region’s tumultuous seafaring history at the Naval and Maritime Museum, where fascinating exhibits include artifacts from the 1916 Chilean rescue of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s crew, who were stranded on Antarctica. Wander among a colony of Magellanic penguins on Magdalena Island, an intimate encounter with nature you won’t soon forget. And for the true adventurer in you, the Torres del Paine National Park offers spectacular vistas of pristine azure lakes surrounded by jagged peaks that slice the sky, an area declared a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve you can reach via an immensely scenic flight over Chilean Patagonia. Whether absorbing the enchanting ambiance of the city or venturing out into the untamed wilderness, your sense of wonder will be awakened by your time in Punta Arenas.

  • Glacier Alley

    Imagine the wonderment of 23-year-old Charles Darwin, sailing aboard the H.M.S. Beagle in 1833, as he witnessed gigantic rivers of ice that crackled while releasing icebergs into the inky waters. Dazzled, he wrote in his journal that “it is scarcely possible to imagine anything more beautiful than the beryl-like blue of these glaciers,” a sentiment you’re likely to agree with, as the icy flows are said to boast one of the most ethereal hues of blue found anywhere. In honor of these daring explorers, the waterway that courses past the glaciers is today known as the Beagle Channel. Named after nations in Europe, the five major glaciers that issue forth from the commanding Darwin Range each show distinctive features but are equally entrancing. During the warmer season, waterfalls might form at the glacier’s lip, cascading vociferously into the channel. The snow-capped mountains looming in the distance contrast dramatically with the coastal slopes, which are covered in vividly green vegetation, and the juxtaposition of all these elements creates a series of panoramas that are certainly among the world’s most spectacularly scenic.

  • Cape Horn

    Reenact one of the greatest achievements of the Age of Exploration by rounding legendary Cape Horn, the arresting headland marking the southernmost point of Chile’s Tierra del Fuego and a place once believed to mark the true end of the world. Jutting forbiddingly from Isla Hornos, the cape is distinguished by precipitous bluffs draped with wind-whipped vegetation. Look to the air for sightings of southern giant petrels, red-legged cormorants and southern royal albatross, regal seabirds equipped to handle the sometimes harsh conditions. Should weather permit, relish an opportunity to alight on Isla Hornos. Although trees cannot flourish at this latitude, you’ll learn that abundant rainfall contributes to a lush terrain of grasses, mosses and lichens that swathe the landscape in shades of green, ochre and burnt sienna. Follow a boardwalk to the memorial dedicated to sailors who have perished in these waters, a splendid steel sculpture that features the silhouette of an albatross, and take a truly memorable photograph beside the world’s southernmost lighthouse.

  • Ushuaia

    In the far southern reaches of Patagonia, you’ll find the port of Ushuaia clinging to what seems to be the very edge of the Earth, a magnificent region known as Tierra del Fuego. With the striking Martial Mountains looming to the north and the picturesque Beagle Channel to the south, Ushuaia rewards intrepid visitors with stunning panoramas as far as the eye can see. Discover a lively Gentoo and Magellanic penguin rookery on Martillo Island or hike through the subantarctic forest of Tierra del Fuego National Park, an immensely scenic landscape of rushing rivers, glassy lakes and snow-capped peaks. Gain a terrific overview of the area by riding the historic Southern Fuegian Railway, sometimes referred to as “The Train of the End of the World,” and pause at lovely Lapataia Bay for a memorable photograph of the iconic sign indicating the Pan-American Highway’s southern terminus. In the evening, dine on some of the region’s superlative seafood, and if you’ve still got energy, pop into a local bar to hear the fascinating tales of fearless travelers just returned from forbidding Antarctica.

  • South Shetland Islands *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Antarctic Sound & Weddell Sea *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Deception Island *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Cuverville Island & Danco Island *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Lemaire Channel & Petermann Island*

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Paradise Bay & Neko Harbour *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.


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Testimonials

We've had a lovely time. My husband's request for his 70th birthday was to be on SeaDream in the Caribbean, and we've really enjoyed it. SeaDream is by far, the best cruise line in the Caribbean. Catherine BlackHenley-on-Thames, Great Britain
Another great trip with SeaDream. We so enjoyed the service & attention to detail. Fabulous food!! Wish we could take you home with us. Mr & Mrs Michael RollandBonita Springs, Florida