Ushuaia to Longyearbyen

Ushuaia to Longyearbyen

Feb 8, 2022 to May 7, 2022

88 Days

SeaDream Innovation

G32201

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Feb 08, 2022 Ushuaia,
Argentina
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Feb 09, 2022 At Sea,
Feb 10, 2022 South Shetland Islands *,
Antarctica
Afternoon Evening
Feb 11, 2022 Antarctic Sound & Weddell Sea *,
Antarctica
Early Morning Evening
Feb 12, 2022 Deception Island *,
Antarctica
Early Morning Evening
Feb 13, 2022 Cuverville Island & Danco Island *,
Antarctica
Early Morning Late Evening
Feb 14, 2022 Lemaire Channel & Petermann Island*,
Antarctica
Early Morning Evening
Feb 15, 2022 Antarctic Circle & Detaille Island *,
Antarctica
Morning Evening
Feb 16, 2022 Vernadsky Station & Neumayer Channel *,
Antarctica
Morning Evening
Feb 17, 2022 At Sea,
Feb 18, 2022 Cape Horn,
Chile
Afternoon Afternoon
Feb 19, 2022 Ushuaia,
Argentina
Morning Evening
Feb 20, 2022 Cape Horn,
Chile
Early Morning Evening
Feb 21, 2022 Garibaldi Glaciers *,
Chile
Early Morning Evening
Feb 22, 2022 Admiralty Sound *,
Chile
Late Evening Late Evening
Feb 23, 2022 Maddalena Archipelago,
Chile
Afternoon Evening
Feb 24, 2022 At Sea,
Feb 25, 2022 Puerto Deseado,
Argentina
Early Morning Evening
Feb 26, 2022 Exploration Day Late Evening Late Evening
Feb 27, 2022 Puerto Madryn,
Argentina
Early Morning Evening
Feb 28, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 01, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 02, 2022 Buenos Aires,
Argentina
Morning Evening
Mar 03, 2022 Punta del Este,
Uruguay
Early Morning Evening
Mar 04, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 05, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 06, 2022 IIhabela,
Brazil
Morning Late Evening
Mar 07, 2022 Paraty,
Brazil
Afternoon Late Evening
Mar 08, 2022 Ilha Grande,
Brazil
Early Morning Late Evening
Mar 09, 2022 Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil
Morning Evening
Mar 10, 2022 Búzios,
Brazil
Morning Evening
Mar 11, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 12, 2022 Salvador de Bahia,
Brazil
Afternoon Overnight
Mar 13, 2022 Salvador de Bahia,
Brazil
Afternoon
Mar 14, 2022 Maceio,
Brazil
Afternoon Evening
Mar 15, 2022 Recife,
Brazil
Morning Evening
Mar 16, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 17, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 18, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 19, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 20, 2022 Praia,
Cape Verde
Morning Afternoon
Mar 21, 2022 Mindelo,
Cape Verde
Morning Afternoon
Mar 22, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 23, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 24, 2022 Tenerife, Canary Islands,
Spain
Morning Afternoon
Mar 25, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 26, 2022 Casablanca,
Morocco
Morning Evening
Mar 27, 2022 At Sea,
Mar 28, 2022 Lisbon,
Portugal
Morning Evening
Mar 29, 2022 Porto,
Portugal
Morning Evening
Mar 30, 2022 A Coruna (Spain),
Spain
Morning Late Evening
Mar 31, 2022 At Sea,
Apr 01, 2022 Bordeaux,
France
Afternoon Late Evening
Apr 02, 2022 Bordeaux,
France
Afternoon
Apr 03, 2022 At Sea,
Apr 04, 2022 Saint-Malo,
France
Morning Late Evening
Apr 05, 2022 Guernsey, Channel Islands,
United Kingdom
Morning Evening
Apr 06, 2022 Dartmouth,
United Kingdom
Morning Evening
Apr 07, 2022 London,
United Kingdom
Evening Overnight
Apr 08, 2022 London,
United Kingdom
Morning Evening
Apr 09, 2022 Amsterdam,
Netherlands
Afternoon Overnight
Apr 10, 2022 Amsterdam,
Netherlands
Late Evening Afternoon
Apr 11, 2022 Hamburg,
Germany
Afternoon Overnight
Apr 12, 2022 Hamburg,
Germany
Afternoon
Apr 12, 2022 Kiel Canal,
Germany
Afternoon Evening
Apr 13, 2022 Copenhagen,
Denmark
Morning Late Evening
Apr 14, 2022 Gothenburg,
Sweden
Morning Evening
Apr 15, 2022 Oslo,
Norway
Afternoon Late Evening
Apr 16, 2022 Oslo,
Norway
Morning Evening
Apr 17, 2022 Exploration Day Late Evening Late Evening
Apr 18, 2022 Bergen,
Norway
Early Morning Evening
Apr 19, 2022 Nordfjord & Selje,
Norway
Early Morning Late Evening
Apr 20, 2022 Alesund,
Norway
Early Morning Evening
Apr 21, 2022 Exploration Day Late Evening Late Evening
Apr 22, 2022 Lofoten Islands,
Norway
Early Morning Afternoon
Apr 23, 2022 Tysfjorden,
Norway
Early Morning Evening
Apr 24, 2022 Tromsø,
Norway
Early Morning Afternoon
Apr 25, 2022 At Sea,
Apr 26, 2022 Bjørnøya,
Norway
Afternoon Evening
Apr 27, 2022 Exploration Day Morning Evening
Apr 28, 2022 Exploration Day Evening
Apr 28, 2022 Exploration Day Morning Evening
Apr 29, 2022 Exploration Day Evening
Apr 30, 2022 Longyearbyen,
Svalbard And Jan Mayen
Morning Evening
May 01, 2022 Hornsund *,
Svalbard And Jan Mayen
Early Morning Evening
May 02, 2022 Krossfjorden *,
Svalbard And Jan Mayen
Morning Evening
May 03, 2022 Exploration Day Early Morning Late Evening
May 04, 2022 Exploration Day Early Morning Late Evening
May 04, 2022 Exploration Day Late Evening
May 05, 2022 Kongsfjorden/Ny Alesund *,
Svalbard And Jan Mayen
Early Morning Evening
May 06, 2022 Isfjorden *,
Svalbard And Jan Mayen
Early Morning Late Evening
May 07, 2022 Longyearbyen,
Svalbard And Jan Mayen
Morning Evening

Ports

  • Ushuaia

    In the far southern reaches of Patagonia, you’ll find the port of Ushuaia clinging to what seems to be the very edge of the Earth, a magnificent region known as Tierra del Fuego. With the striking Martial Mountains looming to the north and the picturesque Beagle Channel to the south, Ushuaia rewards intrepid visitors with stunning panoramas as far as the eye can see. Discover a lively Gentoo and Magellanic penguin rookery on Martillo Island or hike through the subantarctic forest of Tierra del Fuego National Park, an immensely scenic landscape of rushing rivers, glassy lakes and snow-capped peaks. Gain a terrific overview of the area by riding the historic Southern Fuegian Railway, sometimes referred to as “The Train of the End of the World,” and pause at lovely Lapataia Bay for a memorable photograph of the iconic sign indicating the Pan-American Highway’s southern terminus. In the evening, dine on some of the region’s superlative seafood, and if you’ve still got energy, pop into a local bar to hear the fascinating tales of fearless travelers just returned from forbidding Antarctica.

  • At Sea

  • South Shetland Islands *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Antarctic Sound & Weddell Sea *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Deception Island *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Cuverville Island & Danco Island *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Lemaire Channel & Petermann Island*

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Antarctic Circle & Detaille Island *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Vernadsky Station & Neumayer Channel *

    Embark on the adventure of a lifetime, uncovering the world’s most enigmatic and pristine environment, a land of lofty dreams and heroic achievements, resilient creatures and incomparable beauty. In Antarctica, nature’s imagination is fully unleashed as it shapes masses of ice into fantastical shapes that glow from within in hues of blue and green. As you cruise along the rippling waters of the Drake Passage, watch for icebergs appearing on the horizon, some carved into fanciful forms that wouldn’t be out of place in a modern art museum, others iridescent arches that seem to be portals to a faraway world and yet others massive ice shelves fronted by forbiddingly frosty walls. You’ll be accompanied on your journey by enterprising seabirds that take advantage of the ship’s wake to both ease their flight and to detect fish as they disperse. A surprising variety of striking birds hazard the crossing to the last continent, including white-chinned and storm petrels, sooty shearwaters, kelp gulls and black-browed, royal and wandering albatrosses, the latter boasting the world’s largest wingspan, which can grow to an astonishing 12 feet in length. Reaching the South Shetland Islands, the opportunities for discovery truly begin. The more tranquil inlets of this volcanic archipelago might allow for exploration by kayak, bringing you right up to the glimmering chunks of ice bobbing in the sea. Depending on the conditions of weather and ice, you may glide into Yankee Harbor, distinguished by a long, pebbled spit of land that creates a natural breakwater, and meet a colony of brush-tailed gentoo penguins that numbers in the thousands. Perhaps you’ll hop ashore on Half Moon Island, a dazzlingly white landscape interrupted by bare patches of land where remarkably hardy types of lichen and moss subsist. If Deception Island is accessible, you’ll enter its sea-filled eroded caldera by a narrow passage guarded by mammoth sea stacks and evocatively named Neptune’s Bellows. Scattered throughout this sublime island’s scenery lie vestiges of a British base and a whaling station, evidence of human attempts to subdue this indomitable place. Further south, claim your prize as you reach the staggeringly breathtaking coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, an elongated mass of earth and ice that beckons forth like a finger of godlike proportions. Surrounded by glaciers, Neko Harbor invites you to listen closely as enormous hunks of ice crackle and then crumble into the frigid waters. Paradise Harbor lives up to its name, with a swooping topography that attracts a variety of blubbery mammals such as crabeater, leopard, Weddell and fur seals. In Wilhelmina Bay, marvel at the sight of breaching humpback whales, a spectacular backdrop of pristine snow and faceted ice further elevating the experience. Weave among the slow-moving icebergs of the Lemaire Channel and pause at bustling Booth Island, where endearing Adélie, gentoo and chinstrap penguins coexist amicably. As you depart Antarctica across the briny sea, it’s possible to glimpse minke whales and even pods of orcas gracefully skimming through the waves. Although the exact path you’ll have taken is unknown, you can be certain you’ll be forever changed by your foray into Earth’s true final frontier.

  • Cape Horn

    Reenact one of the greatest achievements of the Age of Exploration by rounding legendary Cape Horn, the arresting headland marking the southernmost point of Chile’s Tierra del Fuego and a place once believed to mark the true end of the world. Jutting forbiddingly from Isla Hornos, the cape is distinguished by precipitous bluffs draped with wind-whipped vegetation. Look to the air for sightings of southern giant petrels, red-legged cormorants and southern royal albatross, regal seabirds equipped to handle the sometimes harsh conditions. Should weather permit, relish an opportunity to alight on Isla Hornos. Although trees cannot flourish at this latitude, you’ll learn that abundant rainfall contributes to a lush terrain of grasses, mosses and lichens that swathe the landscape in shades of green, ochre and burnt sienna. Follow a boardwalk to the memorial dedicated to sailors who have perished in these waters, a splendid steel sculpture that features the silhouette of an albatross, and take a truly memorable photograph beside the world’s southernmost lighthouse.

  • Garibaldi Glaciers *

  • Admiralty Sound *

  • Maddalena Archipelago

  • Puerto Deseado

    Retread the steps of Charles Darwin in Puerto Deseado, Spanish name of a settlement christened as Port Desire in 1586 by the privateer Sir Thomas Cavendish, whose ship bore the same name. Much like Darwin, you can navigate inland along the Ría Deseado, a winding waterway lined with dramatic, seemingly barren ravines. You’ll find the opposite is true, as a spectacular variety of wildlife thrives here, including Magellanic penguins, sea lions, red-legged cormorants and sprightly Commerson’s dolphins, which are distinguished by their unexpected black and white coloration. Offshore, sail to austerely beautiful Penguin Island, home to rockhopper penguins renowned for their yellow-feather crests, making them particularly photogenic. View the colossal remains of fossilized monkey puzzle trees and other ancient conifers at the Jaramillo Petrified Forest National Park, a monumental site dating to the Jurassic period. Back in town, train lovers will delight in the Pioneer Railway Station, a wonderfully maintained facility over a century old that pays homage to the golden age of rail travel. You’ll surely marvel that distant Puerto Deseado holds so many splendid treasures.

  • Exploration Day

  • Puerto Madryn

    The perfect embodiment of Patagonia’s adventurous spirit, Puerto Madryn lies in a protected gulf teeming with marine wildlife. In the waters off the nearby Valdes Peninsula, a UNESCO World Heritage site, southern right whales converge yearly during breeding season, a magnificent natural spectacle with few equals. Along the coastline, you’ll find a dazzling variety of sea birds flying above one of the world’s largest colonies of elephant seals. And if you need a bite, take a break in nearby Puerto Pirámides, a minuscule hamlet with several eateries and a laid-back vibe. For a once-in-a-lifetime experience, seize an extraordinary opportunity to snorkel among lithe and docile sea lions, who will cavort around you in an improvised aquatic dance. More enchanting creatures await at Punta Tombo, the most important Magellanic penguin rookery in Patagonia. One of the area’s most surprising attractions is the town of Gaiman, which has retained the Welsh culture of the 19th-century colonists who settled the area. At an authentic tea house surrounded by English gardens, snack on scrumptious cakes and let yourself be transported to the distant British Isles.

  • Buenos Aires

    Few cities in South America can convincingly pass for a European capital, but elegant Buenos Aires certainly fits the bill. With a generous dash of Latin American spirit thrown in, you’ll find the city is a perfect blend of the Old and New Worlds. At elegant Casa Rosada, the seat of Argentina’s government, stand below the balcony where Eva Perón famously spoke to the worshipping masses, and then visit her tomb at the impressive Recoleta Cemetery, a maze of opulent mausoleums reserved for the country’s élite. Fortunately, the city’s greatest pleasures are available to all. It’s hard to go wrong with steak in Buenos Aires, but locals in the know frequent Parrilla Los Cabritos or Don Julio, sipping local Malbec and engaging in lively banter. They also tango at one of the many milongas, or tango gatherings, that take place daily in clubs throughout the city, some of which offer lessons for the amateur hoofer. If you wish to look beyond the urban temptations of Buenos Aires, head out to the legendary plains of Las Pampas and join a gaucho for an invigorating horseback ride through the bucolic landscape.

  • Punta del Este

    Variously compared to glamorous jet-setting destinations around the globe such as Saint-Tropez, the Hamptons and Monaco, luminous Punta del Este nevertheless boasts its own distinctive character. You’ll be drawn to Casapueblo, a fabulous complex of whitewashed buildings cascading toward the sea, a vision conceived by Uruguayan artist Carlos Páez Vilaró that evokes Santorini with a splash of Gaudí. Art is everywhere in Punta del Este, but a perennial favorite is Mario Irarrázabal’s La Mano, or The Hand, five colossal fingers emerging from the inviting sands of Brava Beach. A few miles offshore, you’ll discover Isla de Lobos, a small islet that manages to play host to the Western Hemisphere’s largest colonies of South American sea lions and fur seals, a truly impressive sight. Traveling up the coast, you’ll find La Barra, a chic resort town blessed with wonderful beaches and a relaxed, authentic feel. On your way, you might cross the remarkable Leonel Viera Bridge, whose undulating shape is one of the region’s most notable feats of engineering. Of course, you can simply spend the day in Punta del Este lounging by the sea and watching the world go by at one of the many excellent beachfront cafés.

  • IIhabela

    Rising like a green colossus from the waters off Brazil’s mainland, stunning Ilhabela, or “Beautiful Island,” certainly delivers on the promise of its name. With over 80% of the island named a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and protected as a national park, you’ll find endless opportunities to connect with nature at its most unspoiled. Visit a historic plantation at the jungle’s edge and sample the locally made cachaça, Brazil’s signature liquor, and then cool off at the Cachoeira da Toca, three picturesque cascades that feed a swimming hole. Countless more waterfalls dot the island’s rugged interior, which you can explore on a bicycle or off-road vehicle. On the island’s pristine eastern coast, discover paradisiacal Praia dos Castelhanos, a crescent beach surrounded by lush peaks and adorned with rocky islets just offshore. Ilhabella’s waters are also protected and boast excellent snorkeling and diving sites, including approximately 50 shipwrecks teeming with coral formations, sea turtles and myriad tropical fish. Back in easygoing Ilhabela Town, browse the shops along pedestrian-only Rua do Meio and relax at an outdoor café, a glorious panorama of mountains and sea all around you.

  • Paraty

    Along the lush Costa Verde sits the charming artist refuge of Paraty, set against a backdrop of tropical forests, mountains and waterfalls. Stroll the cobblestone streets of the Old Town, a UNESCO World Heritage site where brilliant pops of color contrast beautifully with whitewashed buildings and the Portuguese colonial architecture has been largely untouched since the town’s gold rush heyday in the 1700s. During your exploration, sample local delicacies and sip a caipirinha in one of many cafes, perhaps lingering for the live music and dancing after dark. Hop into an open-back Jeep for an adventure into the surrounding Atlantic jungle, where you’ll glimpse a stunning array of waterfalls and, if you wish, plunge into natural pools for a swim under the dense tropical canopy. After a rainforest hike, you’ll be rewarded with the aquamarine waters and linen-white sands of Praia do Sono, one of Brazil’s beach treasures, with calm, clear waters you won’t be able to resist. Before you leave Paraty, browse vibrant art galleries such as Aecio Sarti and take a piece of this captivating town home with you.

  • Ilha Grande

    Two hours from Rio de Janeiro lies an island paradise of sugar-white beaches and Atlantic rainforest. Set off on a walk through thick tropical vegetation, home to small monkeys, sloths and hummingbirds, before luxuriant forest gives way to Praia de Lopes Mendes, considered by some the most beautiful beach in Brazil. Surrounded by stunningly clear sea on one side and rows of tropical palms on the other, this long, wide sandy stretch lapped by green-blue waves is mercifully uncrowded. Shower under a cascade of cooling water at Cachoeira da Feiticeira, the island’s 50-foot waterfall, and dip in its natural pool. Savor a lunch of fresh açaí or coconut before diving into the crystal-clear waters of Lagoa Azul for a swim among brightly-colored fish, coral reefs, and the occasional sea turtle or squid. After an invigorating ascent to Pico do Papagaio, discover a bit of heaven 3,200 feet above the rainforest floor. With no cars and no roads on Ilha Grande, there’s nothing but an endless vista of cobalt sky, jade-green mountains and azure ocean, an unfettered look at Brazilian paradise.

  • Rio de Janeiro

    Feel the beating pulse of this stunning world-class metropolis, filled with UNESCO World Heritage treasures, as you explore its side-by-side urban and natural wonders. Hop a cable car and rise 1,300 feet above the city to the peak of Sugarloaf Mountain for dazzling, panoramic views of Rio’s forest-covered hills and mountains, high-rises and favelas, legendary sandy stretches and sapphire sea. Revel in the unparalleled beauty of Ipanema and Copacabana, beaches that handily earn the renown of their timeless namesake songs and feature some of the best people-watching in the world. Marvel at the exceptional, neo-futurist Museum of Tomorrow, with its remarkable eco features, and explore the 8,000-plus acre Tijuca National Park, the largest urban rainforest on the planet. In the Jardim Botânico, 350 acres of natural splendor, encounter toucans, tortoises, sloths and 9,000 exotic plant species including Amazonian lily ponds and towering imperial palms. After wandering the brightly-colored Lapa neighborhood, where infectiously rhythmic samba pairs perfectly with a refreshing caipirinha, make your way to Christ the Redeemer, symbol of Rio and a shining monument to this extraordinary city.

  • Búzios

    Nicknamed the Saint-Tropez of Brazil, this former sleepy fishing village became a fashionable beach destination after French model and actress Brigitte Bardot vacationed here in the 1960s. One of the most beloved resort towns on the 200-mile stretch of Brazil’s Costa do Sol, Búzios boasts 23 sensational beaches and is one of the balmier locales in all of Brazil — even in winter. Bask in the sun at tucked-away Praia Joao Fernandinho, where tranquil, transparent aquamarine waters are ideal for a swim, snorkeling or paddle boarding. Back in town, stroll the Rua das Pedras, the best place to eat, drink and shop, with a charming European feel that recalls the town’s Portuguese colonial past. While away an afternoon at Rocka Beach Lounge, perched on a hillside over the emerald waters of Praia Brava and serving some of the region’s most creative seafood dishes. Stroll the soft sands of Praia da Tartaruga and stay for the sunset, the perfect end to a restorative day in Búzios.

  • Salvador de Bahia

    To fully experience Brazil’s mesmerizing medley of cultures, you can’t do much better than Salvador, a bustling city rich in historical significance. Meander the cobblestone streets of the Pelourinho district, a UNESCO World Heritage site adorned with countless postcard-worthy colonial Portuguese buildings coated in appealing pastels. Elegant Baroque churches dot the neighborhood, including the 18th-century Igreja de Nossa Senhora do Rosário dos Pretos, built by slaves that were not permitted to worship with the free townsfolk, and the Igreja e Convento de São Francisco, whose elaborately ornamented interior is sure to dazzle you. Watch the locals come and go at the Lacerda Elevator, an art deco marvel of engineering that connects Salvador’s upper and lower neighborhoods and offers fabulous views of Todos os Santos Bay. Exiting the elevator at the upper level, you can’t miss the magnificent Rio Branco Palace, a neoclassical delight. At the city’s southwestern tip, you’ll find the oldest lighthouse in the Americas, the 1698 Farol da Barras, which is now part of the engaging Nautical Museum of Bahia. While strolling the waterfront, be sure to visit one of the city’s beloved ice cream shops, where exotic seasonal fruits are transformed into mouthwatering treats.

  • Maceio

    There are so many alluring beaches in Maceió you’d be forgiven if you never set foot inside the city. One of the best is Ponta Verde Beach, whose offshore reef keeps the waters calm and clear and also allows for excellent snorkeling opportunities. At the seaside Pajuçara Handicraft Market, browse for mementos including the traditional local lacework known as rendas, which are dyed in a kaleidoscope of tropical colors. Venturing inland, you’ll find much of the city wraps around Lagoa Mundaú, an estuarine lagoon framed by mangrove islands and a favorite spot for boaters. The compact historical center showcases several colonial Portuguese gems, including the Théo Brandão Museum, a fanciful structure with captivating exhibits on the region’s history and craftsmanship. Facing a bustling square, you’ll discover the photogenic Bom Jesus dos Martírios church, whose façade is elaborately ornamented with white-and-blue tiles. Reinvigorate yourself with fresh coconut water from one of the friendly vendors at the São Gonçalo Belvedere, enjoying sweeping views of the city that stretch all the way to the turquoise sea.

  • Recife

    Named for the reef that protects this cosmopolitan coastal city and dubbed the “Venice of Brazil” for the inlets and canals that crisscross the city, Recife enjoys year-round temperatures in the 80s, splendid for reveling in its many dazzling beaches. Praia Boa Viagem, its most famous sandy stretch, spans seven miles of golden sand and cerulean surf. Lining Boa Viagem is an upscale district with outstanding bars and restaurants, the place to see and be seen as you samba the night away. Recife is also blessed with culture, from the Museum of Modern Art Aloisio Magalhães to the Ricardo Brennand Institute, an imposing castle estate that holds a staggering collection of swords, suits of armor and other knightly paraphernalia. Mere miles north of Recife lies Olinda, a living museum of an oceanside town whose historic center has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. You’ll step back in time as you meander the lanes of this remarkably preserved colonial Portuguese city, with its many vibrant pastel houses, Baroque churches and airy gardens.

  • Praia

    Gain an unfiltered perspective on daily life in the gorgeous Cape Verde archipelago during a visit to the capital of Praia, which hugs a protected bay on the island of Santiago. Just above the port, you’ll find the Plateau district, an attractive collection of 19th-century historic homes, tidy parks and public buildings, as well as an impressive statue of Diogo Gomes, the Portuguese navigator credited with discovering the island. To intermingle with locals, browse the goods at the Sucupira Market, a colorful riot of fruit, vegetables and an array of African goods. Explore the oldest European colonial settlement in the tropics, Cidade Velha, established by the Portuguese in 1462 and still retaining exceptional features from the era, such as a fort, churches and a quaint square, which have earned it UNESCO World Heritage site designation. If you head to the center of Santiago, you’ll encounter a gorgeous panorama of jagged mountains carpeted with emerald-green vegetation. Continuing further north, pass banana plantations and charming villages before reaching Serra Malagueta National Park, where hiking trails lead to overlooks affording incredible vistas of the island.

  • Mindelo

    Absorb the warmhearted spirit of São Vicente, a beguilingly arid island with dramatic hints of its volcanic past. In the bustling capital of Mindelo, wander among cheerfully painted colonial Portuguese buildings such as the People’s Palace and the former custom’s house, site of the intriguing Mindelo Cultural Center. Snap memorable photographs of the Torre de Belem, a replica of Lisbon’s renowned landmark, and then stroll to Praça Estrela, where you can browse handmade jewelry, wood carvings and other unique mementos imported from West Africa. Soak up the island’s unusual beauty by exploring Praia Grande, a lengthy stretch of white sand fringed by black lava mountains, making for a striking visual contrast. For extraordinary views of São Vicente’s breathtaking geography, hike to the peak of Monte Verde, the island’s highest point, later descending to the marvelous Baía das Gatas, where you can cool off with a swim in a sheltered lagoon of remarkably clear blue-green waters. Toast your adventures with a refreshing pontche, a traditional Cape Verde cocktail made with sugarcane molasses and grogue, a bracing local liqueur.

  • Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Tenerife is the largest of the seven Canary Islands, Spain. Tenerife also boasts the highest elevation of Spain, and has been awarded World Heritage Site status. It happens to be the third largest volcano in the world from its base, El Teide at more than 12,000 ft/ 3,660 m. The island's capital contains the architectural symbol of the Canary Islands, the modern Auditorio de Tenerife. Hugely popular, Tenerife, has both flat areas (covered with banana plantations) and mountainous areas. Santa Cruz is where you'll find a wide variety of shopping opportunities and fascinating architecture. If golf is your game, the island offers eight championship courses to choose from. The yacht docks at the commercial pier and guests have some nice land adventures to choose from. If this happens to be your embarkation point, we can happily provide transfer information for you.

  • Casablanca

    The name Casablanca can’t help but conjure romance, and you’ll be glad to learn that this reputation is rightly earned. Stroll among the locals in expansive Mohammed V Square, which is ringed by regal buildings melding French colonial, Moorish and art deco influences, all anchored by an exuberant fountain. The French influence is also felt in the 1930s Habous District, a delightful jumble of streets peppered with bustling souks, handsome mosques and ornate archways. Gaze in awe at the Hassan II Mosque, whose soaring minaret is said to be the world’s tallest. A bit further south lies the Portuguese City of Mazagan, a UNESCO World Heritage site recognized for its beautifully preserved Renaissance military construction. Walk along the ramparts for terrific views of the sea and then descend into the colonnaded cisterns, where shafts of light shining from above contribute to the immensely atmospheric experience. Heading north, the glorious Andalusian Gardens of Rabat astound with gorgeous grounds landscaped in a quintessentially Moorish style. Don’t leave Casablanca without sampling a contemporary twist on a classic tagine in the hip Gauthier Quarter, a perfect embodiment of the city’s ardent love affair with both past and future.

  • Lisbon

    Lisbon is the capital as well as the largest city in Portugal. It is one of the oldest cities in the world. Lisbon has two sites listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Sites: Belem Tower and Jeronimos Monastery. The city stretches along the banks of the Tejo river. This is primarily an embark/debark port of call for SeaDream.

  • Porto

    Straddling the mouth of the Douro River, the splendid city of Oporto holds such architectural importance that the entire historic center has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. A great place to begin your exploration is Praça da Liberdade, a lengthy public esplanade lined with graceful 19th-century buildings. You’ll find the city has no shortage of marvelous churches, from the imposingly fortified Porto Cathedral to the graciously appointed Clérigos Church, whose soaring bell tower offers panoramic vistas over the city’s picturesque red-tile roofs. In the 1906 Lello Bookstore, prepare to be swept away by elaborate art nouveau features including a sinuous double staircase and a luminous stained-glass skylight. But what’s a visit to Oporto without sampling its signature export, the fortified wine that shares the city’s name. Tour one of the illustrious cellars dotting the Douro’s southern bank, where port is crafted just as it has been for centuries, and savor exquisite samples of the sweet libation. When evening comes, take advantage of Oporto’s reputation as the best place to eat in Portugal, perhaps choosing among the delectable cod dishes for which the city is renowned.

  • A Coruna (Spain)

  • Bordeaux

    Bordeaux is a port city on the Garonne River in the Gironde department in southwestern France. The city of Bordeaux, with a population of 239,157 inhabitants in 2010, is the ninth largest city in France; its metropolitan area is the sixth largest in France, with a population of 1,127,776. It is the capital of the Aquitaine region, as well as the prefecture of the Gironde department. Its inhabitants are called "Bordelais" (for men) or "Bordelaises" (women). The term "Bordelais" may also refer to the city and its surrounding region. Bordeaux is the world's major wine industry capital. It is home to the world's main wine fair, Vinexpo (fr), while the wine economy in the metro area takes in 14.5 billion euros each year. Bordeaux wine has been produced in the region since the 8th century. The historic part of the city is on the UNESCO World Heritage List as "an outstanding urban and architectural ensemble" of the 18th century.

  • Saint-Malo

    Saint-Malo was heavily bombed during World War II, but you won’t be able to tell as you wander among the painstakingly reconstructed granite mansions of this stately city. Enclosed by a forbidding defensive wall, Saint-Malo was once notorious as a center of corsair mischief but also benefitted enormously from the Atlantic trade after the discovery of the New World, which endowed the city’s merchants with great wealth. The ramparts showcase several impressive gates, including the photogenically squat twin towers of the Grande Porte, and these days the streets enclosed within are alive with a multitude of tempting shops and inviting galleries. Further afield, you’ll discover two of the most magical villages in Brittany. Dinan is a perfect snapshot of the French Renaissance, a cluster of half-timbered homes whose charmingly askew façades are often festooned with blooming geraniums. Along the coast to the east, rising from a tidal flat like a mystical apparition, you’ll find iconic Mont Saint-Michel, possibly the most photographed hamlet in the world. As you ascend winding cobbled lanes to the town’s glorious Benedictine abbey, you’ll appreciate why this medieval jewel has earned UNESCO World Heritage site designation.

  • Guernsey, Channel Islands

    Boasting an immensely picturesque coastline, the Channel Island of Guernsey has long attracted artists such as Auguste Renoir to its welcoming shores. In the capital of St. Peter Port, wander through commanding Castle Cornet, a 13th-century marvel of military engineering that sits on a rocky headland jutting out at sea. Admire some of the earliest heated glass houses at the Candie Gardens, whose elegantly landscaped grounds are laid out with Victorian thoughtfulness and contemplate Victor Hugo’s not entirely uncomfortable exile at Hauteville House, the splendid manor where he wrote Les Miserables. Hop on a bicycle to explore the picturesque hills and dales of the island, perhaps riding past a herd of the island’s famed namesake cows, and revitalize at an authentic tea house, where age-old traditions are carefully observed. For that perfect keepsake, shop along cobbled streets overflowing with charm, maybe pausing at a fresh-caught seafood restaurant for a taste of the island’s famed crab. No matter how you choose to spend your time, the leisurely pace of life in delightful Guernsey will replenish your spirit.

  • Dartmouth

    Once a notorious sanctuary for unprincipled privateers, Dartmouth has left its turbulent past behind in exchange for a serenely picturesque atmosphere. You’ll find the incredibly photogenic Dartmouth Castle, a compact but well-preserved crenellated fortification, guarding the scenic mouth of the Dart River. The town’s wonderful harbor is also postcard-worthy, with fishing boats bobbing in the shimmering water and a hodge-podge of narrow houses climbing up a gentle hill. For a genuine English country village feel, browse the one-of-a-kind shops and galleries along Foss Street, which makes its way upward to the gracious 14th-century St. Saviour’s Church. Admire the grand Edwardian architecture of the Dartmouth Royal Naval College, which has been training young cadets since 1905, and on public days enjoy a tour of the elegant inner rooms. To experience the wonders of the bygone industrial age, travel via authentic steam train along the scenic coast of Devon or ply the Dart River aboard the United Kingdom’s only completely restored coal-fired paddle steamer. Back in Dartmouth, drop by the Cherub Inn, which is housed in an enchantingly uneven 14th-century wood-beam house, and make some new friends among the welcoming locals.

  • London

    Synonymous with royalty, London is a living testament to the lofty achievements of the mighty kings and queens that have presided over this storied island nation. Witness the changing of the guard at gracious Buckingham Palace, a cherished custom that is both timeless and precisely on time, and tour the Houses of Parliament, the city’s other magnificently ornate center of power and a UNESCO World Heritage site. Cross the iconic Tower Bridge on your way to view the utterly dazzling Crown Jewels, which are kept in the once-forbidding Tower of London, another UNESCO site. After refreshing with a pint of beer at a classic English pub, sample the best of contemporary art at the essential Tate Modern, which is housed in a former brick power station. Next door, you’ll find the faithful reconstruction of Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, where Romeo and Juliet can keep falling in love for eternity. Stroll through immaculately manicured Hyde Park, shop in tony Covent Garden and take in the entire city from the London Eye observation wheel, as the resonant chimes of Big Ben comfort both Londoners and visitors with time-honored tones known the world over.

  • Amsterdam

    You might begin your exploration of resplendent Amsterdam with a cruise along its meticulously planned network of canals, a UNESCO World Heritage site lined with quintessentially Dutch gabled buildings. Otherwise, do as the locals do and ride a bicycle, as this mode of transportation is so ubiquitous you’ll have no trouble blending in while you’re catching the sights. Amsterdam is an art lover’s nirvana, with a multitude of world-class museums at one’s fingertips, including the Van Gogh Museum, the Rembrandt House Museum and the Rijksmuseum, which overflows with masterpieces from the Dutch Golden Age. A more sobering experience awaits at the Anne Frank House, where the brief but effulgent life of the endearing Jewish girl concealed during World War II is vividly evoked. Breathe in the restorative scent of fresh flowers at the famed Keukenhof Gardens, revered for their dazzling array of tulips just under an hour away from the city. If you’re here outside of tulip season, fret not, as you’ll still find a breathtaking variety of blooms. And for an essential Dutch experience, visit the quaint town of Zaanse Schans, where timeless riverside windmills spin gently in the breeze.

  • Hamburg

    It might surprise you to learn that cosmopolitan Hamburg contains more bridges that London, Amsterdam and Venice combined, which stems from the city’s inextricable connection to its waterways. Nowhere is this more evident than in the harborside Speicherstadt, or City of Warehouses, a late 19th-century and early 20th-century district of ornately designed red-brick buildings designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. In the nearby International Maritime Museum, sate your hunger for all things sailing with an exhaustive collection of seafaring artifacts, including thousands of ship models. You’re sure to notice the city’s striking Elbphilharmonie concert hall, an architectural masterpiece by Herzog & Meuron that towers over the recently inaugurated HafenCity district, an ambitious and cutting-edge mix of residential, commercial and public spaces. For a reminder that Hamburg’s rich past is also noteworthy, visit the marvelously elaborate Rathaus, or Town Hall, and then ascend to the nearly 350-foot-tall observation deck of the Baroque St. Michael’s Church for superb city views. A short ferry ride away, the hillside Treppenviertel Blankenese residential district beckons with its stately mansions and quaint cottages, a lovely historic snapshot mercifully spared from the ravages of World War II.

  • Kiel Canal

    Thrill to one of the world’s most unique cruising experiences, a transit of the storied Kiel Canal. The idea for a waterway connecting the Baltic and North Seas was conceived by Chancellor Otto von Bismarck during the Danish-German War of 1864, as the Germans were keen to avoid Danish hostility while sailing around the Jutland Peninsula. The ambitious project, however, didn’t come to fruition until 1895 under the auspices of Wilhelm II, albeit right on budget. These days, the canal’s purpose is primarily mercantile, and it is in fact the world’s busiest shipping route. As such, you can expect to pass cargo vessels from every imaginable corner of the world carrying a mesmerizing variety of goods. While transiting, look out over a famously flat landscape of well-tended fields, dense forests and quaint villages, and pass under a succession of steel overpasses, including the fascinating Rendsburg High Bridge, both a railway viaduct and a transporter bridge. When you emerge into the open sea, you’ll have the satisfaction of having undertaken a remarkable transit only available to smaller cruising vessels.

  • Copenhagen

    There’s much to treasure in glorious Copenhagen, one of Europe’s most beautiful capital cities. No visit is complete without indulging your inner child at the Tivoli Gardens, a fantastical amusement park and pleasure garden that melds the atmosphere of 19th-century Europe with recreations of Far East architecture, all amid wonderfully manicured grounds. After paying your respects to the city’s iconic statue of Hans Christian Andersen’s Little Mermaid, shop to your heart’s content on Strøget, an elegant lane flanked by sophisticated boutiques housed in graceful buildings. Although its exterior is handsomely austere, the interior rooms of the 18th-century Christiansborg Palace are sure to dazzle you with their extravagant stucco ceilings, brilliant chandeliers and gilded furniture. Fast forward to the 19th century at the spectacular Copenhagen Botanical Garden, where innumerable plant species are showcased in absolutely stunning historical glasshouses. Should you have the stomach for it, take in the entire city from the tower of the Church of our Saviour, which must be reached via vertiginous exterior spiral staircase. No matter how you’ve spent your day, a terrific place to wind down is the quayside Nyhavn district, where colorful historic buildings host an eclectic choice of cafés, bars and restaurants.

  • Gothenburg

    With its unique geography and easygoing ambiance, Sweden’s second largest city holds its own among the distinguished capitals of Scandinavia. Stroll broad Avenyn boulevard to Götaplatsen, a lively gathering place dominated by an expressive bronze sculpture of Poseidon. Step beyond the god of the seas and discover the Gothenburg Museum of Art, whose acclaimed masterpieces include sublime works by Anders Zorn and Edvard Munch. For a strikingly different experience, venture underground to the Aeroseum, a Cold War-era secret hangar that now holds an impressive collection of military aircraft. The Swedes’ reverence for nature is evident among the blooms of the splendid Botanical Garden, which takes pride of place in the heart of the city. Further afield, the scenic granite islets of the Gothenburg Archipelago offer a tranquil respite from daily life. Browse a motley selection of fresh-caught seafood at the Feskekôrka fish market, which evokes a Norwegian stave church, perhaps sampling the region’s famed lobster and crayfish. On the cobbled streets of Haga, a once scrappy district of attractive brick warehouses and wooden homes, pause at a cozy café for fika, a friendly chat over coffee and pastries that is among Sweden’s many charming customs.

  • Oslo

    Norway is a land steeped in myth, where irascible gods armed with frost and lightning once inspired Viking clans to plunder foreign lands. These days, genteel customs imported from mainland Europe have softened the country’s hard edges, but traces of an unruly past still abound. The exceptional museums dotting the Bygdøy Peninsula hold some of the city’s foremost attractions, including a thousand-year-old longship that was preserved in mud and the 12th-century Gol Stave Church, an exemplar of Norway’s distinctive wood sanctuaries. No less fascinating is a visit to the 1892 Fram, a legendary ship revered for her vital role in early polar explorations. To witness the evolution of Oslo’s soul, contrast battle-hardened Akershus Fortress, a ruggedly elegant citadel wrapped in nearly impregnable ramparts, with the neoclassical Royal Palace, whose formal exterior encloses sumptuously appointed rooms. You might wish to view Edvard Munch’s iconic The Scream, which hangs in the outstanding Norwegian National Gallery amid priceless European and Scandinavian masterworks. In expansive Frogner Park, wander among Gustav Vigeland’s thought-provoking sculptures, and if you’ve worked up an appetite, choose among the many restaurants and cafés lining the charming waterfront district of Aker Brygge.

  • Bergen

    In the distant 14th-century, the powerful merchant guilds of the Hanseatic League established an overseas office in Bergen, thus transforming a sleepy fishing village into a strategically vital trading hub. Their legacy endures in Bryggen, a harborside district of colorful Hanseatic warehouses and a UNESCO World Heritage site. For an invaluable glimpse into Norwegian life in the 18th and 19th centuries, visit the Old Bergen Museum, where wooden homes and shops characteristic of the city’s past are populated with vintage furnishings and reenactors in period attire. You’ll want to have your camera ready at Bergen’s faithful recreation of the Fantoft Stave Church, a uniquely Norwegian place of worship built from wood and characterized by sharply sloped roofs and Viking motifs. In Bergenhus Fortress, admire medieval stone buildings that are among the best preserved in Norway, including compellingly austere Haakon's Hall. To fully appreciate Bergen’s appeal, take a funicular to the summit of Mount Fløyen for breathtaking views of the city and the surrounding mountains, emerald giants that slumber among sparkling, island-strewn fjords.

  • Nordfjord & Selje

    Legend has it that Norway’s Saint Sunniva fled to this stunning fjord-cleaved region rather than marry a heathen Irish king. Once you view Selje’s panorama of striking mountains that give way to verdant valleys and sparkling bays, you’ll understand what drew her to this exquisite land. Cross a narrow channel to Selja Island, where the captivating remains of a 12th-century Benedictine monastery endure as testament to the saint’s renown. Remarkably, the abbey’s wonderfully austere tower stands nearly intact above a carpet of emerald grass and lovely wildflowers that flutter in the breeze. Hike the Risnakken trail for wonderful vistas over Selje and the glistening maze of waterways that lead to the Norwegian Sea, and then continue your exploration on the windswept terrain of Vestkapp, the westernmost point in Norway still connected to the mainland. In a cozy restaurant crowning Vestkapp’s seaside plateau, savor home-made Norwegian specialties while reveling in far-reaching views of the rugged coast. Sitting on a cliffside boulder beside the vast, rippling sea, you’ll feel a stirring sense of communion with nature’s boundless beauty.

  • Alesund

    Sail into an awe-inspiring realm seemingly shaped by titans, who carved meandering watery pathways between densely forested peaks. Alesund is the gateway to Geirangerfjord, a UNESCO World Heritage site whose scenery of sheer bluffs capped by pristine woodland exemplifies the best of the Norwegian fjords. However, the town is also known for its extensive art nouveau architecture, built in the early 20th century after a destructive fire razed nearly every existing structure. Walk streets lined with pastel homes adorned with turrets and other whimsical touches, popping into enticing shops offering wild raspberry jams and locally made wool sweaters. The Atlanterhavsparken, or Atlantic Sea Park, provides a terrific look at Norway’s indigenous marine life, with giant tanks holding salmon, cod and halibut as well as enchanting exhibits featuring harbor seals and sea otters. Gain a bird’s-eye view of the entire city from the Fjellstua viewpoint, reached by an invigorating 400 steps but well worth your efforts as you gaze across a landscape of jade-green islands and sinuous waterways. On nearby Godøy Island, stand at Earth’s threshold beneath the red-and-white striped Alnes Lighthouse, since 1852 safely guiding sailors to Alesund’s sheltered shores.

  • Lofoten Islands

    In Lofoten, you could take a photograph with your eyes shut and still be nearly guaranteed to capture a frame-worthy panorama. Explore this cluster of breathtakingly exquisite islands, some nearly flat and coated in vividly green meadows and others pierced by picturesquely jagged mountains that reach for the heavens. Aquamarine waters kiss pale-sand beaches that wouldn’t seem out of place in the South Pacific, an unexpected paradise for both bathers and surfers. To feel on top of the world, conquer the peaks of Ryten, Svolvaer Fløya or Festvågtind, moderately challenging ascents with enormously rewarding views of land and sea. You’ll delight in the area’s fishing villages, whose buildings are painted in cheerful colors that charmingly contrast with the granite walls of the surrounding mountains. Visit historic Nusfjord and gain insight into the region’s seafaring heritage, as the town is an open-air museum featuring a cod-liver oil factory and an old-fashioned store among its many attractions. In quaint Reine, stroll along the breakwater to the lighthouse and take in awe-inspiring views of colossal Reinebringen Mountain. As you sup on the region’s delectable seafood, the spirited conversation among your traveling companions will certainly center on the indelible beauty of glorious Lofoten.

  • Tysfjorden

    Glide into majestic Tysfjorden, a branching waterway that offers a glimpse into Norway at its most unspoiled. The deepest fjord in the region, its shores are lined with a variety of stunning landscapes, from commanding granite-faced mountains to gently sloping terrain blanketed in densely packed evergreens. Gaze in awe at iconic Stetind, a spire-like peak whose stark slopes reach spectacularly for the skies. Along the way, you’ll pass enchanting villages with cherry-red and mustard-hued buildings that provide a vivid pop of color against the azure, green and gray of the surrounding scenery. In lovely Korsnes, walk along the pier and keep your eye trained on both water and sky, as you might catch sight of sea otters, cormorants, sea eagles and even harbor porpoises. Learn about the fascinating Sámi people, otherwise known as Laplanders, at the town of Drag’s Árran Lule Sámi Center, studying absorbing artifacts and traditional garb. Carved into a smooth rock that gradually drops into Tysfjorden, discover 9,000-year-old etchings of native creatures including a bear, elk, reindeer, two swans and a life-size killer whale, marvelous mementos of long-gone tribes who once inhabited this sublime setting.

  • Tromsø

    If you’re seeking a northern Eden, it doesn’t get much closer than Tromsø, an unhurried city cradled by spectacular fjords and titanic mountains. Depending on the date of your visit, you might be favored by the northern lights, among nature’s most magnificent displays, or marvel at the nightless days of the midnight sun. Wind along the glasslike waters of the Balsfjorden, Kaldfjorden, Ullsfjorden and Malangen fjords, watching achingly beautiful panoramas unfold as you keep a sharp eye out for seals, eagles and reindeer. In Tromsø, delight in the angular forms of the Arctic Cathedral, which evokes a steep, snow-coated mountain or slabs of ice jutting into the sky. A short distance away, ride a cable car to nearly 1,400 feet above sea level for sweeping views of the town and the intense blues, greens and whites of the surrounding scenery. Examine a unique array of cold-climate plants at the Arctic-Alpine Botanical Garden, which showcases specimens from far-flung lands such as Tibet, and unwind with a cold one at celebrated Macks Ølbryggeri, a local institution that is proud to be “the world’s northernmost brewery.”

  • Bjørnøya

    Among its spellbinding natural attractions, the nearly uninhabited island of Bjørnøya, or Bear Island, does not typically play host to its namesake animal, although polar bears have been known to wander ashore when the Arctic ice pack expands far enough south. The only land mammal that resides here year-round is the elusive arctic fox, but the island is famed for its incredible breeding populations of sea birds, which include northern fulmars, black-legged kittiwakes, little auks and thick-billed guillemots, all numbering in the tens of thousands. Binoculars in hand, watch the birds as they bob on the water or perch on the precipitous cliffs that line the southern coastline. Dip in and out of rocky coves, discovering majestic rock formations shaped over millennia by wind and water, and pass through the astounding Perleporten, a navigable sea cave with entrances at both ends and an unforgettable experience if the weather allows passage. On land, treasure the sight of delicate purple and yellow blooms that vividly contrast with the barren yet dramatically picturesque terrain of the island, a distant place you’ll forever hold near to your heart.

  • Longyearbyen

    Originally established as a mining town along breathtaking Isfjorden, Longyearbyen is now Svalbard’s largest city, a vibrant cultural hub and an ideal launching pad for your polar adventures. Fulfill a lifelong dream by riding a sled pulled by huskies and visit a mysterious ice cave, whose translucent walls gleam in shades of blue and white. Journey to the Russian mining ghost town of Pyramiden, where fascinating vestiges of a once thriving operation still stand, and continue to Barentsburg, an inhabited Russian settlement that offers a compelling contrast to Longyearbyen. For an invigorating adventure, kayak among small chunks of ice floating offshore or hike through Svalbard’s lunar-like landscapes, perhaps ascending to Plateau Mountain for superlative views or trekking to the critically important Global Seed Vault, a repository for Earth’s plant life. Learn the exhilarating tales of intrepid explorers at the North Pole Expedition Museum, where exhibits shed light on some of history’s most daring voyages. Hang up your coat at Huset, a sophisticated eatery that wouldn’t be out of place in the world’s culinary capitals, and try unusual and impeccably prepared regional dishes such as reindeer and seal steak.

  • Hornsund *

    Slicing into the southern tip of Spitsbergen Island, Hornsund is treasured as one Svalbard’s most beautiful fjords. Its somewhat misleading name derives from a set of reindeer antlers found by explorers in the 17th century, as well as the belief that it cut through to the other side of Spitsbergen, which would have made it a sund, or sound. The fjord’s tallest peak is the towering, serrated Hornsundtind, but dramatic rock formations are plentiful along the shore, including the needle-like Bautaen. To the east, imposing plateau-shaped mountains with horizontal layers of sediment recall an American West landscape, albeit a perpetually frigid one. Where the tundra has taken hold, vibrant flowers emerge and substantial colonies of little auks congregate, ideal conditions for reindeer and Arctic fox. Of the people who have settled here throughout history, the most fascinating may be Wanny Wolstad, a Norwegian woman who joined an expedition to Svalbard in 1932 and settled in Hornsund, becoming an expert trapper in defiance of the era’s social norms and expectations. With luck, you might see the formidable polar bears she once hunted, brought into Hornsund atop floating icebergs carried by ocean currents.

  • Krossfjorden *

    The earliest known explorer of this fjord was Jonas Poole, an Englishman who bravely made his way here in 1610. Trekking about a mile inland, he left a cross as a marker indicating the date of his arrival, which in turn provided the fjord with its name. Other crumbling traces of human activity can be found in the area, most memorably a secret WWII German weather station, which provided valuable data for planning attacks on convoys. The landscape of the fjord and its tributaries is utterly majestic, with several glaciers coming to an end in the frigid waters. You’ll be mesmerized by Lilliehook, a uniquely horseshoe-shaped glacier that extends for approximately 4.5 miles. Interrupting the stillness, awesome chunks of ice periodically collapse into the fjord, forming slow-moving islands of ice. Elsewhere, gently sloping hills that descend to the shoreline are carpeted with tundra, attracting reindeer, Arctic fox and barnacle geese, hardy residents of this magical land.

  • Kongsfjorden/Ny Alesund *

    At 16 miles long, Kongsfjorden is one of Svalbard’s shortest fjords, but it is ringed by no fewer than six impressive glaciers that continually feed the water with newly calved hunks of ice, each seemingly lit from within by supernatural blue light. Polar bears may claim these icebergs as temporary homes, since they provide optimal staging points from which to hunt seals. The latter creatures are abundant, with ringed and bearded seals often clustered along the shores or venturing into the water for prey. Early whalers favored this waterway, which is still frequented by minke whales and Belugas that skim through the fjord in sociable pods. The industrial zeal of the early 20th century is evident on the island of Blomstrandhalvøya, where a marble quarrying operation called Ny London was established in 1911. Today, only remnants of the housing and equipment remain, as the marble was quickly found to be of inferior quality. From enthralling history to gorgeous scenery, Kongsfjorden perfectly encapsulates the essence of Svalbard.

  • Isfjorden *

    As the island of Spitsbergen’s longest fjord and the second longest in all of Svalbard, Isfjorden offers ample opportunities for thrilling exploration. To the north, the frozen mountains of the Nordre Isfjorden National Park give birth to massive glaciers that meander into the fjord. In Ekmanfjorden, one of Isfjorden’s branches, step ashore for views of impressive Kolosseum Mountain, keeping your eyes peeled for Arctic fox skittering about and seals relaxing on ice floes offshore. While cruising past Isfjorden’s tallest cliffs, you’ll observe significant populations of sea birds such as kittiwakes, Brünich’s guillemots and even alluring puffins, whose large, bright-orange beaks are instantly recognizable. The fjord also shelters most of Svalbard’s human residents, with the archipelago’s largest population found in the capital of Longyearbyen and a few Russians in the smaller settlement of Barentsburg. Perhaps most intriguing of all, Pyramiden is a mostly abandoned Russian mining colony that evokes the communist era with its severe apartment blocks. Surprisingly, the inviting Hotel Pyramiden opens for business during the warmer months, an excellent place to sip on hot tea and discuss the day’s adventures.


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Please Note: Fares are capacity controlled and may change without notice. The fares are per person based on double occupancy. Single and third person rates are also available. SeaDream Yacht Club strongly recommends that all guests purchase travel insurance.


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Testimonials

... we were again thrilled and enjoyed the same high as was the case in both previous sails. Peter & Liz CulnaneBrisbane, Australia
...We had a great time-best ever, and will be coming back...Charlie and I feel like we've been yachting with our "best friends". Hard to believe we didn't know anyone on the yacht 8 days ago-now we've met new traveling friends for the years to come. Mr & Mrs Charles HoganSeattle, Washington