NORTHERNMOST ADVENTURE

NORTHERNMOST ADVENTURE

Longyearbyen to Kanazawa

Jul 13, 2022 to Sep 21, 2022

70 Days

SeaDream Innovation

G32202

This adventure-filled voyage sails from Europe to Asia. Leave from Longyearbyen to trace Iceland’s Viking history before sailing through the Northwest Passage. Given the unpredictable movement of the Arctic ice, your itinerary through Canada’s wilderness may vary. Uncover the Russian Far East before reaching Japan, a bucket list destination.

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Jul 13, 2022 Longyearbyen,
Svalbard And Jan Mayen
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Jul 14, 2022 Exploration Day,
Late Evening Late Evening
Jul 15, 2022 Exploration Day,
Late Evening Late Evening
Jul 16, 2022 Exploration Day,
Late Evening Late Evening
Jul 17, 2022 Exploration Day,
Late Evening Afternoon
Jul 18, 2022 At Sea,
Late Evening Late Evening
Jul 19, 2022 Northeast Greenland National Park *,
Greenland
Afternoon Late Evening
Jul 20, 2022 Scoresbysund *,
Greenland
Late Evening Late Evening
Jul 21, 2022 Scoresbysund *,
Greenland
Late Evening Late Evening
Jul 22, 2022 Scoresbysund *,
Greenland
Late Evening Evening
Jul 23, 2022 At Sea,
Jul 24, 2022 Akureyri,
Iceland
Early Morning Evening
Jul 25, 2022 Hornstrandir,
Iceland
Early Morning Late Evening
Jul 26, 2022 Hornstrandir,
Iceland
Early Morning Evening
Jul 27, 2022 Reykjavik,
Iceland
Morning Evening
Jul 28, 2022 Heimaey,
Iceland
Early Morning Evening
Jul 29, 2022 At Sea,
Jul 30, 2022 Angmassalik,
Greenland
Early Morning Afternoon
Jul 31, 2022 Skjoldungen,
Greenland
Early Morning Evening
Aug 01, 2022 Prins Christianssund,
Greenland
Morning Late Evening
Aug 02, 2022 Qaqortoq,
Greenland
Early Morning Late Evening
Aug 03, 2022 Qassiarsuk,
Greenland
Early Morning Evening
Aug 04, 2022 At Sea,
Aug 05, 2022 Nuuk,
Greenland
Early Morning Evening
Aug 06, 2022 Kangaamiut,
Greenland
Early Morning Afternoon
Aug 07, 2022 Disko Bay (Ilulissat),
Greenland
Afternoon Late Evening
Aug 08, 2022 Disko Bay (Eqip Sermia),
Greenland
Early Morning Evening
Aug 09, 2022 At Sea,
Aug 10, 2022 Kangerlussuaq,
Greenland
Morning Evening
Aug 11, 2022 Eternity Fjord *,
Greenland
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 12, 2022 Sisimiut,
Greenland
Early Morning Evening
Aug 13, 2022 Disko Bay,
Greenland
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 14, 2022 At Sea,
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 15, 2022 Clyde River, Nunavut *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 16, 2022 Baffin Island,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 17, 2022 Baffin Island,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 18, 2022 Pond Inlet, Nunavut,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 19, 2022 Devon Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 20, 2022 Ellesmere Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 21, 2022 Croker Bay,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 22, 2022 South Devon Fjords *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 23, 2022 Beechy Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 24, 2022 South Devon Island *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 25, 2022 Exploration Day,
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 26, 2022 Bellot Strait *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 27, 2022 Larsen Sound *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 28, 2022 Victoria Strait *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 29, 2022 Cambridge Bay *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Aug 30, 2022 At Sea,
Aug 31, 2022 Ulukhaktok (Holman) *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Sep 01, 2022 Walker Bay/Smoking Hills *,
Canada
Late Evening Late Evening
Sep 02, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 03, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 04, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 05, 2022 Nome, Alaska,
United States
Morning Evening
Sep 06, 2022 INTERNATIONAL DATE LINE - LOSE A DAY Late Evening Late Evening
Sep 07, 2022 At Sea,
Afternoon Evening
Sep 08, 2022 Gabriella Bay,
Russian Federation
Afternoon Evening
Sep 09, 2022 Nataliya *,
Russian Federation
Morning Evening
Sep 10, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 11, 2022 Komandor Islands *,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Evening
Sep 12, 2022 Kamenistaya Bay*,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Afternoon
Sep 13, 2022 Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Evening
Sep 14, 2022 Atlasov *,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Afternoon
Sep 15, 2022 Srednego Yankicha,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Evening
Sep 16, 2022 Chirpoy *,
Russian Federation
Early Morning Afternoon
Sep 17, 2022 At Sea,
Afternoon Evening
Sep 18, 2022 Rishiri,
Japan
Early Morning Evening
Sep 19, 2022 At Sea,
Sep 20, 2022 Sado Island,
Japan
Morning Evening
Sep 21, 2022 Kanazawa,
Japan
8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • Longyearbyen

    Originally established as a mining town along breathtaking Isfjorden, Longyearbyen is now Svalbard’s largest city, a vibrant cultural hub and an ideal launching pad for your polar adventures. Fulfill a lifelong dream by riding a sled pulled by huskies and visit a mysterious ice cave, whose translucent walls gleam in shades of blue and white. Journey to the Russian mining ghost town of Pyramiden, where fascinating vestiges of a once thriving operation still stand, and continue to Barentsburg, an inhabited Russian settlement that offers a compelling contrast to Longyearbyen. For an invigorating adventure, kayak among small chunks of ice floating offshore or hike through Svalbard’s lunar-like landscapes, perhaps ascending to Plateau Mountain for superlative views or trekking to the critically important Global Seed Vault, a repository for Earth’s plant life. Learn the exhilarating tales of intrepid explorers at the North Pole Expedition Museum, where exhibits shed light on some of history’s most daring voyages. Hang up your coat at Huset, a sophisticated eatery that wouldn’t be out of place in the world’s culinary capitals, and try unusual and impeccably prepared regional dishes such as reindeer and seal steak.

  • Exploration Day

  • At Sea

  • Northeast Greenland National Park *

    At approximately 375,000 square miles and covering over a fourth of Greenland’s landmass, Northeast Greenland National Park is one of the world’s largest protected areas and a deeply rewarding destination truly off the beaten path. Its forbidding interior is comprised of a seemingly unending ice sheet, with the surrounding coastline broken up by spectacular glaciers of staggering scale. Barren, sculptural mountains and plateaus encase the slow-moving rivers of ice, providing a haven for an unexpected variety of wildlife, most notably about 40% of the world’s musk oxen. Although the local polar bears are shy, it’s possible to spot them along with walrus, collared lemmings, stoats, Arctic hares and Arctic foxes. A wealth of wildlife populates the frigid waters, including several species of seals and many types of whales, of which the pale Beluga and the curiously tusked narwhal may be the most striking. You’ll discover that the ever-present birds also merit attention, from the loon with its distinctive call to the stunningly hued king eider. Cruising beside this land completely uninhabited by humans might be the closest you’ll ever be to nature in its purest form.

  • Scoresbysund *

    Boasting one of the largest fjord complexes in the world, Scoresbysund astonishes visitors with its surprisingly fertile and colorful terrain. Thanks to the wide mouth of the main fjord, which never entirely freezes, and the protection afforded by towering basalt cliffs that blunt the winds, numerous species are drawn to this relatively sheltered corner of Greenland. Vast populations of musk ox traverse the landscape of vibrant tundra while Arctic fox, Arctic hare and other native fauna dart among the low-lying vegetation. This being Greenland, however, ice is ever-present atop the commanding peaks and carved into breathtaking icebergs that glide through the glassy waters. Splendid birds circle overhead or amble gingerly on the rocky coasts, including enchanting puffins, regal gyrfalcons and adorable little auks. Along the coast, imposing walruses vie for space with ringed, harp, hooded, harbor and bearded seals, all in competition for the sea’s rich bounty. As you meander these sublime fjords, you’ll be grateful for the privilege to share the exquisite scenery with such glorious creatures.

  • Akureyri

    Despite boasting the second largest population in Iceland after Reykjavik, Akureyi is a cozy town of under 20,000 that provides access to some of Iceland’s most stunning attractions. You’ll find Akureyi at the very end of Eyjafjördur, a magnificent fjord lined with emerald fields that arc toward snow-capped summits. The surrounding Mývatn region is blessed with spectacular waterfalls such as Godafoss, Selfoss and Dettifoss, lauded as the most powerful cascade in Europe. As a soothing respite, step into the geothermically heated waters of the Mývatn Nature Baths, soaking in waters rich in beneficial minerals. You’ll be delighted by the Laufás turf houses, whose simple white-and-red façades hold up grass-covered roofs that magically blend into the adjacent hill. Stroll the pathways of the Arctic Botanical Gardens, the world’s northernmost garden of its kind, and marvel at a colorful array of blooms that burst forth in the warmer seasons. For a terrific panorama of the town and countryside, climb the steps to the Akureyrarkirkja church, a splendid example of mid 20th-century architecture, and enjoy Akureyri’s more playful side at the Christmas House, a themed shop and garden that sells Icelandic holiday handicrafts and mouthwatering treats that make for a perfect gift or a tempting indulgence for yourself.

  • Hornstrandir

    Jutting out from northwestern Iceland, much like the horn its name suggests, gorgeous Hornstrandir shimmers in shades of brown, green and yellow that beguilingly transition from one to another as the topography shifts. A nature reserve that is part of the greater Westfjords region, the spellbinding scenery is distinguished by upwardly curving terrain that suddenly breaks off and gives way to sheer seaside cliffs. Throughout the emerald meadows coating the land, Arctic fox wander freely in search of the region’s appetizing birds. Birdwatchers need not fear, however, as the industrious foxes could barely put a dent in the avian population, which numbers in the millions. In the haven of Hornvík Bay, you’ll discover eye-catching waders such as sandpipers, redneck pharalopes and golden plovers. But the main show is found on the surrounding cliffs of Hælavíkurbjarg and Hornbjarg, where significant numbers of puffins, fulmars, kittiwakes and razorbills are nearly dwarfed by the world’s largest colonies of guillemots. As you lose count of the agile sea birds soaring overhead, you’ll feel your spirit take flight beside them.

  • Reykjavik

    Welcome to the vibrant capital of Iceland, a cosmopolitan city and an inviting haven found amid some of the world’s most dramatic scenery. Towering above the skyline, the remarkable Hallgrímskirkja church echoes the geometry of basalt columns, whereas the angular Harpa Concert Hall dazzles with its countless faceted glass panels. In the National Museum of Iceland, examine an enthralling collection of artifacts tracing over 1,200 years of history, including the treasured 13th-century Valþjófsstaður door, whose intricate carvings depict the slaying of a dragon. The Perlan Museum offers the compelling opportunity to wander through a faithful recreation of an ice cave among its many fascinating exhibits. Gaze at the iconic Sun Voyager sculpture, an evocative take on a Viking longship, and in Árbæjarsafn meander through a recreated Icelandic village that brings pre-modern Reykjavik to life. The bucolic island of Viðey is home to Yoko Ono’s renowned Imagine Peace Tower, beams of light sent skyward, and offers the chance to see delightful puffins in the wild. In the countryside, marvel at spectacular waterfalls such as Seljalandsfoss and Gullfoss, one of the most photographed places in Iceland. A visit to the famed Blue Lagoon is almost de rigueur, geothermically heated waters rich in minerals that provide the perfect balm for the adventurous traveler.

  • Heimaey

    Just off the southern coast of Iceland, the Westman Islands dot waters teeming with humpback, minke and killer whales. The largest among them, Heimaey is an emerald bowl punctuated by Eldfell Volcano, which erupted as recently as 1973. Lace up your hiking boots for an ascent to the 725-foot-high peak, which offers unparalleled views over the entire island. In the Eldheimar Museum, dive into absorbing details about the eruption and also learn about the nearby island of Surtsey, which formed in 1963 due to undersea volcanic activity and is a scientifically invaluable UNESCO World Heritage site. During your wanderings, it’s likely you’ll come across vividly beaked puffins, as about half of Iceland’s specimens of this enchanting bird are found on the Westman Islands. Against a backdrop of precipitous lava cliffs, visit the spartan yet beautiful Heimaey Stave Church, a replica of one built in Norway in the year 1,170 and a gift from the Scandinavian country to Iceland. Stroll the picturesque harbor, where excellent seafood restaurants offer phenomenal views of turf-capped rocky outcroppings and delicious local dishes such as the Icelandic stew known as plokkfiskur.

  • Angmassalik

  • Skjoldungen

  • Prins Christianssund

    This winding channel, which slices off the bottom tip of Greenland, owes its Western name to a 19th-century Danish prince. However, the Greenlandic name of Ikerasassuaq, which translates to “long channel,” seems more appropriate, as the astonishing sound stretches for approximately 66 miles. During your leisurely passage, you’ll enjoy a visually dazzling journey between jagged, striated mountains that plunge into startingly blue-green waters. Where soil has accumulated, vividly hued grasses and lichens have taken hold, contrasting dramatically with the granite gray and icy whites of the surrounding scenery. Occasionally, a glacier emerges from the rock walls, calving colossal icebergs into the sound. Marvel at these astoundingly shaped ice sculptures, whose coloration varies from pure white to shades of emerald and electric blue. As you pass the tiny village of Aappilattoq and its cheerfully painted houses, you might be amazed to learn residents live here year-round. Nevertheless, you’ll agree that the undeniable beauty and majesty of Prince William Sound is as inspiring a place to call home as anyone could wish for.

  • Qaqortoq

    Located amid southern Greenland’s tangle of fjords and interconnected waterways, the welcoming city of Qaqortoq spreads out on a gentle slope beside the sea. Despite having a modest population that hovers just over 3,000, it is one of the largest settlements in Greenland. Colorfully painted buildings dot a landscape that bursts into vivid greens during the reasonably mild summers, allowing for easy exploration on foot. During your wanderings, you’ll likely come across some of the dozens of carvings etched by several artists into boulders and rock faces, a fascinating open-air exhibition known as Stone and Man. Visit the Qaqortoq Museum for insight into the area’s Norse past and to view a collection of traditional artifacts such as Inuit canoes and harpoons. The 1832 Vor Frelsers Kirke, or Church of Our Savior, is a wonderfully photogenic deep-red structure, while further into the fjord, the remains of the 14th-century Hvalsey Church stand out superbly against the stark landscape. Surrounded by wildflowers, dip into the soothing hot springs at nearby Uunartoq, a perfect spot from which to watch impressive icebergs, and perhaps kayakers, slowly float by.

  • Qassiarsuk

    Over a millennia ago, Icelander Erik the Red reached the bay where Qassiarsuk is found today, thrilled to discover a lush countryside of rolling fields blanketed in grass. This evocative landscape, where sheep farming is conducted almost exactly as it has been for centuries, received UNESCO World Heritage site designation for its unique cultural importance. While wandering the picture-perfect setting, you’ll come across vivid patches of yellow and purple wildflowers, and if you’re lucky, catch the glint of a crystal lodged into the area’s rock formations. Visit reminders of the earliest settlers, including reconstructions of a Viking longhouse and Thjodhild’s church, whose roof is picturesquely covered in turf. You can also enter a traditional Viking dwelling, which seems to be built directly into a mound of earth and grass. Partway up a hill overlooking the town, a statue dedicated to Leif Erikson, son of Erik, honors the accomplishments of the fearless explorer, whose journey to the American continent predated Columbus’ by nearly five centuries. From here, you’ll enjoy phenomenal views of the glittering bay and the scattered homes of marvelous Qassiarsuk.

  • Nuuk

    Welcome to Nuuk, the capital of Greenland and its largest city. As such, it is home to several eminent cultural institutions, including the National Museum of Greenland, where priceless artifacts trace over 4,500 years of Norse and Inuit history. While admiring the cheerfully colored buildings found along the waterfront, you’ll notice a house built in 1728 by Hans Egede, one of the area’s first Danish settlers, whose statue crowns a nearby promontory. In the Nuuk Art Museum, examine terrific paintings by Emanuel A. Petersen, a 20th-century artist committed to representing the peoples and landscapes of Greenland. A journey by boat or kayak into the surrounding complex of fjords takes you beside mammoth icebergs, melting-ice waterfalls and even past breaching humpback whales. Climb up the nearby mountain of Quassussuaq, or Little Malene, for awe-inspiring views over the web of waterways and mountains encircling Nuuk, and then warm up with a visit to one of the city’s cozy cafés, where a local favorite is coffee infused with whiskey, Kahlua, Grand Marnier and a dollop of whipped cream. A legend accompanies this bracing libation, but you’ll need to ask a local for the beguiling details.

  • Kangaamiut

  • Disko Bay (Ilulissat)

  • Disko Bay (Eqip Sermia)

  • Kangerlussuaq

    Lying at the inland terminus of a lengthy fjord with the same name, Kangerlussuaq provides ready access to Greenland’s immense ice sheet. The town’s economy centers on the airport, which was built by U.S. forces during WWII and is the largest in Greenland. The absorbing Kangerlussuaq Museum, found in buildings that were once part of the American base, details the airport’s unique role during the global conflict and the subsequent Cold War. The town’s main attraction, however, is undoubtedly Greenland’s magnificent ice sheet, which is only a few miles away. As you travel through the frigid hinterlands, be on the lookout for the region’s abundant musk ox and caribou, which flock to the rivers and lakes strewn about the landscape. You’ll be humbled by the nearly 200-foot-high wall of the Russell Glacier, a living mass of frozen water that advances nearly 100 feet every year and regularly shaves off huge sections of its icy façade. If you’re curious about what lies beyond, book a sightseeing flight for an unforgettable bird’s-eye view over one of the world’s largest Arctic expanses.

  • Eternity Fjord *

  • Sisimiut

    Just a few miles above the Arctic Circle, you’ll find seaside Sisimiut, which fans out on a plain beneath imposing Nasaasaaq mountain. The town’s name translates as “the people at the fox burrows,” an intriguing appellation that alludes to the region’s earliest dwellers. Gain insight at the Sisimiut Museum, whose entrance is reached through a spellbinding whalebone arch. The enlightening exhibits cover four thousand years of history, from artifacts of the ancient Saqqaq peoples to an 18th-century kayak, with an outdoor section that includes a reproduction of a furnished early 20th-century peat house. A stroll around town reveals other compelling historic buildings, such as the 1725 Gammelhusset, or Old House, and the 1775 Bethel Church, an unassuming but highly picturesque sanctuary painted in vivid blue. There are myriad hiking opportunities in the surrounding wilderness, with a standout being the relatively easy ascent of Palasip Qaqqaa Mountain. From the summit, you’ll appreciate extraordinary views of the town and a rugged landscape of winding fjords, wind-swept islands and serrated mountain ranges that dominate the horizon.

  • Disko Bay

    The vast expanse of Disko Bay is an environmental treasure that exemplifies the best of Greenland’s untamed wilderness. Emerging from the bay’s eastern coast, the enormous Sermeq Kujalleq, or Jakobshavn Glacier, releases about 10% of Greenland’s icebergs into the bay’s frosty waters. Some of these ice chunks can be truly gargantuan, with heights of over half a mile on record. Listen closely and you’ll discern the rumbling of these newborn giants as they slough off the edge of the glacier. For centuries, hardy Inuit and Norse settlers hunted here, harvesting the pelts of seals, walrus tusks and the bounty of resources carried by whales. These creatures still populate the area, so keep an eye out for clusters of rowdy walruses lounging on the shore, a contented seal resting atop an ice floe and humpback whales splashing through the waves. Perhaps you’ll glimpse some of the humpback’s more exotic relatives, including orcas, pilot whales or narwhals, whose distinctive tusk has earned them the moniker “unicorn of the sea.” In Disko Bay, you’ll feel as if you’ve been granted admission into one of Earth’s grandest natural playgrounds.

  • Clyde River, Nunavut *

  • Baffin Island

    Despite being the fifth-largest island in the world, only a few thousand people call Baffin home, which means its plentiful natural gifts remain wholly pristine. Most of the population resides in the friendly town of Iqaliut, deep within Frobisher Bay. From here, it’s a short distance to Sylvia Grinnell Territorial Park, an undulating expanse of tundra flecked with intriguing ruins of the Thule people as well as vibrant wildflowers that flourish during the warmer seasons. In the artist’s haven of Cape Dorset, browse captivating Inuit handicrafts, including soapstone carvings, colorful tapestries and native clothing. Along the island’s eastern coast, frozen Auyuittuq National Park is the origin point of glaciers that snake into Baffin Bay. Countless fjords line the irregular shoreline, each flanked by towering mountains that contort into fantastic shapes. Near Baffin’s northern tip, Sirmilik National Park offers the avid outdoor explorer the opportunity to snowmobile across ice-covered terrain, perhaps encountering seals and polar bears, or to sea kayak in search of narwhals and Beluga whales. In the evening, you might revitalize over a dinner of local delicacies such as arctic char with musk ox sausages accompanied with bannock bread generously slathered in tundra blueberry jam.

  • Pond Inlet, Nunavut

    For centuries a wellspring of dashed hopes and herculean triumphs, the Northwest Passage was viewed as the ultimate trophy for European powers seeking to find a faster trading route to Asia. It wasn’t until 1906, however, that after many hardships Norwegian Roald Amundsen completed the challenging feat aboard the compact herring boat Gjøa. He would be amazed to learn that just over a century later travelers would be able to accomplish the same journey in a matter of days and in plush comfort. Because weather and the movement of the Arctic pack ice aren’t always predictable, each itinerary may vary. You’ll likely visit Baffin Island, the fifth largest island in the world and a sublime realm of soaring peaks, vast plains and exquisite wildlife. Amid the island’s awe-inspiring eastern fjords, you’ll find the town of Clyde River, or Kangiqtugaapik in Inuktitut, and discover the fabulous whalebone carvings of the local artists. In Pond Inlet, or Mittimatalik, browse splendid wall hangings, red and green soapstone carvings and other unique handicrafts. As you sail the waters offshore, look for the legendary narwhal, whose spiraling tusk can measure up to nine feet long and was once used to prove the existence of unicorns. On starkly bewitching Devon Island, the largest uninhabited island on Earth, visit an abandoned outpost of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and hike the tundra searching for ringed and bearded seals, musk oxen, Arctic hare, walrus and the solitary polar bear. While you cruise to Croker Bay, which is fed by two glorious glaciers, pods of narwhals and beluga whales may accompany the ship. You’ll learn about Sir John Franklin’s disastrous 1845 expedition on Beechy Island, where grave markers memorialize the crew of 129, all of whom perished in the icy wastes. Wander Somerset Island’s derelict outpost of Fort Ross, once a trading hub for fur trappers, and keep binoculars ready for white-rumped sandpipers, snow geese, black-bellied plovers and king eiders. The rugged coastline of Victoria Island, with its many protected coves, offers ample opportunities for exploration along serene expanses of rust-hued grasses that come alive with blooms of vividly purple oxytropis arctobia. Cambridge Bay, or Iqaluktuuttiaq, offers access to Ovayuk Territorial Park, filled with meaning for nomadic Inuit, who tell tales of three giants who starved here and formed three hills inhabited by caribou, Arctic fox and lemmings. In tiny Ulukhaktokk, you’ll be surprised to find the world’s northernmost golf course as well as renowned artisans that create traditional Inuit art and prints. During your meanderings from one island to another, you’ll be enchanted by singularly shaped hunks of ice, glowing from within in ethereal blue. At Franklin Bay, prepare for the breathtaking sight of the Smoking Hills, bluffs of bituminous shale that are in a constant state of combustion. Watch plumes of smoke emerge from a charred landscape scarred in shades of crimson and saffron, as if Vulcan himself were patrolling these shores. After your exhilarating voyage through the Northwest Passage, you’ll join the illustrious and elite circle of daring explorers who mapped the way for this unforgettable adventure.

  • Devon Island *

    Relish a chance to visit the place on Earth that most resembles Mars, according to NASA scientists. Devon is the world’s largest uninhabited island, a mysterious landmass of over 20,000 square miles, blanketed by ice on its eastern side and bewitchingly barren to the west. During the brief growing season, bursts of color emerge from the usually frozen tundra, and wildlife such as musk ox, black guillemots and northern fulmars make their presence known. In sheltered Dundas Harbor, along the island’s southern coast, roam the ghostly remains of an outpost established by Hudson’s Bay Company in 1924. You might be amazed to discover several wood buildings still stand, only visited by the occasional walrus. Nearby Croker Bay is fed by two colossal glaciers, icy titans that release glittering icebergs into the water. With luck, you’ll catch sight of a polar bear watching over a seal hole atop one of the masses of ice. Incredibly, even in this remote place the cycle of life is as vital as ever.

  • Ellesmere Island *

  • Croker Bay

    For centuries a wellspring of dashed hopes and herculean triumphs, the Northwest Passage was viewed as the ultimate trophy for European powers seeking to find a faster trading route to Asia. It wasn’t until 1906, however, that after many hardships Norwegian Roald Amundsen completed the challenging feat aboard the compact herring boat Gjøa. He would be amazed to learn that just over a century later travelers would be able to accomplish the same journey in a matter of days and in plush comfort. Because weather and the movement of the Arctic pack ice aren’t always predictable, each itinerary may vary. You’ll likely visit Baffin Island, the fifth largest island in the world and a sublime realm of soaring peaks, vast plains and exquisite wildlife. Amid the island’s awe-inspiring eastern fjords, you’ll find the town of Clyde River, or Kangiqtugaapik in Inuktitut, and discover the fabulous whalebone carvings of the local artists. In Pond Inlet, or Mittimatalik, browse splendid wall hangings, red and green soapstone carvings and other unique handicrafts. As you sail the waters offshore, look for the legendary narwhal, whose spiraling tusk can measure up to nine feet long and was once used to prove the existence of unicorns. On starkly bewitching Devon Island, the largest uninhabited island on Earth, visit an abandoned outpost of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and hike the tundra searching for ringed and bearded seals, musk oxen, Arctic hare, walrus and the solitary polar bear. While you cruise to Croker Bay, which is fed by two glorious glaciers, pods of narwhals and beluga whales may accompany the ship. You’ll learn about Sir John Franklin’s disastrous 1845 expedition on Beechy Island, where grave markers memorialize the crew of 129, all of whom perished in the icy wastes. Wander Somerset Island’s derelict outpost of Fort Ross, once a trading hub for fur trappers, and keep binoculars ready for white-rumped sandpipers, snow geese, black-bellied plovers and king eiders. The rugged coastline of Victoria Island, with its many protected coves, offers ample opportunities for exploration along serene expanses of rust-hued grasses that come alive with blooms of vividly purple oxytropis arctobia. Cambridge Bay, or Iqaluktuuttiaq, offers access to Ovayuk Territorial Park, filled with meaning for nomadic Inuit, who tell tales of three giants who starved here and formed three hills inhabited by caribou, Arctic fox and lemmings. In tiny Ulukhaktokk, you’ll be surprised to find the world’s northernmost golf course as well as renowned artisans that create traditional Inuit art and prints. During your meanderings from one island to another, you’ll be enchanted by singularly shaped hunks of ice, glowing from within in ethereal blue. At Franklin Bay, prepare for the breathtaking sight of the Smoking Hills, bluffs of bituminous shale that are in a constant state of combustion. Watch plumes of smoke emerge from a charred landscape scarred in shades of crimson and saffron, as if Vulcan himself were patrolling these shores. After your exhilarating voyage through the Northwest Passage, you’ll join the illustrious and elite circle of daring explorers who mapped the way for this unforgettable adventure.

  • South Devon Fjords *

  • Beechy Island *

  • South Devon Island *

  • Bellot Strait *

  • Larsen Sound *

  • Victoria Strait *

  • Cambridge Bay *

    The Inuit name of Ikaluktutiak, which means “good fishing place,” explains the allure of this isolated yet starkly beautiful settlement. Located on the southern coast of enormous Victoria Island, the area has been valued for millennia by the native peoples, who thrived on the region’s musk ox, caribou, ringed seals, Arctic char and lake trout. In the town’s shops, you’ll appreciate the skill of the local artists, who create intricate carvings in soapstone, antler, ivory and turquoise gemstone among other materials. Explore the surrounding coves and islands aboard a sea kayak, perhaps paddling up to the solitary Old Stone Church or encountering migratory nesting geese. In nearby Ovayok Territorial Park, traverse a moon-like landscape and discover Ovayok, also known as Mount Pelly, a wide promontory that rises 656 feet in height and provides a relatively easy hike. Along the way, vividly hued wildflowers brighten the path and musk ox may be seen roaming the plains. While enjoying uninterrupted views in all directions from the top, ponder the legend of the giants who collapsed here, creating the very hill you are standing on.

  • Ulukhaktok (Holman) *

  • Walker Bay/Smoking Hills *

  • Nome, Alaska

    Soak up true Alaskan wilderness in Nome, a small settlement famed as the terminus of the Iditarod Sled Dog Race. Although the event takes place in March, you can capture photos of the momentous Iditarod Burled Arch, final crossing line of the 1,049-mile trek. Learn about the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, only accessible by air, at Nome’s visitor’s center, where park rangers provide illuminating insight about the landmass that once connected Asia to the Americas. Just north of town, the extraordinary White Alice Site harkens back to the Cold War, featuring gigantic radar installations that predate the advent of satellite communications. While out of town, catch sight of some of the region’s striking wildlife, which includes musk oxen, golden eagles and peregrine falcons, and visit one of the many gold dredges scattered about the countryside, a reminder that Nome was briefly a booming gold rush town. Absorb the storied history of the region at the terrific Carrie M. McLain Memorial Museum and learn about the Three Lucky Swedes, the first to exploit the area’s bounty and subjects of a sculpture in Nome’s Anvil City Square, where the world’s largest gold pan offers an amusing photo opportunity.

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  • Gabriella Bay

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Nataliya *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Komandor Islands *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Kamenistaya Bay*

    Step into a land of giants at Kamenistaya Bay, part of the Kamchatka Peninsula’s vast Kronotsky Nature Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site peppered with myriad geysers and active volcanos that reach for the heavens. From offshore, admire the conical silhouette of these astonishing mountains, which are streaked by rivers of snow and are the source of the region’s awe-inspiring nickname, the Land of Fire and Ice. Black sand beaches rim the bay, testament to eons of volcanic activity. During the warmer season, countless rivers and streams of melted snow rush toward the shore, creating scenic waterfalls and ponds that teem with fish. Eurasia’s largest protected population of brown bears roam the landscape, seeking out the salmon that allows them to grow to sizes of over 1,200 pounds. On the vividly green coastal meadows, you may spot big-horned sheep and marmots along with a variety of seabirds circling above noisy colonies of Steller sea lions. With no human settlements anywhere near, in spectacular Kamenistaya Bay nature has the freedom to reach its ultimate expression without restraint.

  • Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy

    Arriving at the port of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, you might wonder who might be so brazen as to live practically in the shadow of not one but several active volcanoes. The droll locals, however, speak of nearby Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky Mountains affectionately, as if they were simply troublesome but beloved members of the family. Ascend to the summit of Mishennaya Hill for magnificent views of this trio, which periodically cough out plumes of smoke. Further afield lies the tumultuous heart of Kamchatka, a UNESCO World Heritage site for its approximately 300 volcanoes and awe-inspiring scenery of fumaroles, hot springs, mud pots, geysers and lava rivers. Book a helicopter flight over this living landscape, a rainbow of acidic colors, untouched snow and verdant vegetation that thrives against all odds. In the city, the Holy Trinity Orthodox Cathedral dazzles with its polished golden onion domes, the stunning crown to an appealing blue and white façade. The local crab is renowned, so be sure to give it a try along with Pyatiminutka red caviar, an indulgence fit for a tsar that is best enjoyed with a warming sip of vodka.

  • Atlasov *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Srednego Yankicha

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Chirpoy *

    In the untamed Russian Far East, you’ll uncover a world where land and sea teem with marvelous creatures that grip the imagination and intriguing indigenous tribes that cherish age-old customs. From frigid territories that reach into the Arctic to volcanic islands within miles of Japan, this vast region is among the most enigmatic the world over. Keep in mind that planning, weather and sea conditions will determine the exact route and stops on each itinerary. Separating the East Siberian Sea from the Chukchi Sea, tundra-covered Wrangel Island is so ecologically significant it has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The lack of trees allows for easier observation of its denizens, which include Arctic fox, reindeer, walruses and stunning polar bears, who meander among the astounding bones and tusks of extinct woolly mammoths. On tiny Kolyuchin Island, hauled-out walruses share space with guillemots and charming puffins, whose broad, colorful beaks provide one of the voyage’s most lasting memories. Making your way around the Chukotka Province, the least densely populated in Russia, look to the seas for appearances of ghostly Beluga whales and baleen gray whales, both magnificent in their own right. The area’s abundant bays allow for landings in a variety of environments, from endless expanses of tundra to tranquil bays surrounded by towering peaks where brown bear, reindeer and whopper swans freely roam. In the Chukchi and Yupik villages scattered about, admire the intricate walrus ivory carvings meticulously created by these native peoples. On Verkhoturova Island, you might ascend to a panoramic outlook for excellent views of colonies of guillemots, cormorants, kittiwakes and unusual tufted puffins, which are distinguished by yellow tufts that originate from the eyes and suggest the appearance of a dignified tsar. Villages on the mainland such as Tymlat or Ossora provide a chance to sample local specialties such as herring, salmon and delectable caviar, and traditional performances help gain insight into the absorbing culture of the Koriak. Much further offshore, the Commander Islands beckon with a fur seal rookery, sea otter rafts and the hallowed grave of monumental Danish explorer Vitus Bering. The teardrop-shaped Kamchatka Peninsula is a primordial land, speckled with 127 volcanoes of which 22 remain active. In the Valley of the Geysers, accessible via helicopter, hot springs, mud pots and geysers burst through the rugged terrain and create a spellbinding motley scenery awarded UNESCO World Heritage site designation. Numerous rivers descend from the mountains into the sea, creating navigable channels that can be explored in search of fauna such as regal Steller’s sea eagles and brown bears busy catching salmon. The largest city in the region, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, is beautifully framed by the conical Koryaksky, Avachinsky and Kozelsky volcanoes. Should you venture further south, the volcanic Kuril Archipelago and the islands of the Sea of Okhotsk shelter enormous colonies of northern fur seals and Steller sea lions, and their proximity to Japan is evident in traces of military bases and shipwrecks. Whether standing beside a glittering crater lake or on a black sand beach, the transcendent allure of the Russian Far East never ceases to astonish.

  • Rishiri

    The nearly circular island of Rishiri was formed by a now extinct volcano that rises symmetrically from its very center. Picturesquely draped in jade green vegetation, the mountain is known as Rishiri Fuji for its pleasing similarity to Japan’s cherished symbol, Mount Fuji. Well-tended paths for hiking the volcano are available, but exquisite views of the splendid peak can be had from the idyllic lakes of Himenuma and Otamori. At Kanro Spring, sip revitalizing, crystal-clear water that rushes out from beneath moss-covered boulders. Cycling the coastline of the serene island is another superb option, as Rishiro’s circumference is a mere 35 miles and provides captivating glimpses of fishing villages and quaint shrines. At seaside Senhoshimisaki Park, marvel at fanciful lava rock formations among which curious spotted seals meander. Whether you want to relax at the end of an active day or simply pamper yourself, sink into the soothing waters at Rishirifuji Onsen, a hot spring surrounded by a lovely Japanese garden whose cherry blossom trees burst into pink blooms every spring.

  • Sado Island

    The curiously shaped island of Sado features a low-lying plain that is flanked by two mountain ranges, giving this unique land a shape reminiscent of an anvil. At one end of the flatlands, stroll along lovely Lake Kamo for stunning views of the mountains and their forest-covered slopes, perhaps passing one of the many enchanting shrines found lakeside. Beneath the ground, the Kinzan Gold Mine depicts how this precious ore was extracted during the Edo Period, including animatronics that emulate that difficult conditions of the workers from the era. The island is filled with reminders of its volcanic origins, from black sand beaches to the otherworldly rock formations found along its shores. A memorable way to explore the coastline is aboard a tarai-bune, or tub boat, which is a simple oval barrel piloted by a woman in traditional Meiji-era garb. Bird-lovers will rejoice at the opportunity to see specimens of the endangered Japanese crested ibis, which are carefully protected at the Toki Forest Park Conservation Center. Don’t forget to sample the region’s sake at one of the island’s many breweries, as Niigata Prefecture, where Sado is located, is acclaimed for producing the finest varieties of this beloved Japanese libation.

  • Kanazawa

    The Edo period in Japan was the age of shoguns and samurai, during which Kanazawa Castle, a typical Japanese fortress, was the seat of the powerful Maeda Clan. At the foot of the castle lies the Samurai district, where upper and middle-class warriors made their homes. A restored residence provides a peek into their lives. In the Higashi Chaya District, discover the country’s teahouse heritage. Also intriguing is the 16th century Ninja Temple. Billed as a place of worship, it garnered its sobriquet because of its cunning, hidden defenses. Gardens have long played an important role in Japanese culture. Kenrokuen is considered one of the best, with all the requisite features that make a perfect landscape, including spaciousness, seclusion, abundant water and expansive views. A wide variety of flowering trees provide a vista that changes by the season. Kanazawa also has a few modern surprises. The Museum of Contemporary Art features 21st century artists from around the globe, and its circular architecture does not include a main entrance. For a snack, don’t miss the trendy gold leaf-topped ice cream cone – yes, it is real gold.


Suites & Staterooms

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*Government, Port, Document Issuance, Handling & Service fees: $2720 per guest



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Testimonials

At SeaDream, our experience was great in the lap of nature (at sea). The hospitality, courtesy and responsibility was at its height... flowing throughout the voyage. Really a memorable experience!! Mitu & Harjit SinghMumbai, India
... we were again thrilled and enjoyed the same high as was the case in both previous sails. Peter & Liz CulnaneBrisbane, Australia