Oslo to Civitavecchia (Rome)

Oslo to Civitavecchia (Rome)

Aug 10, 2021 to Aug 28, 2021

18 Days

SeaDream I

12129C

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Aug 10, 2021 Oslo,
Norway
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Aug 11, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 12, 2021 Little Belt Transit,
Denmark
Morning Morning
Aug 12, 2021 Faaborg,
Denmark
Morning Late Evening
Aug 13, 2021 Kiel Canal,
Germany
Morning Morning
Aug 14, 2021 Schveningen,
Netherlands
Morning Evening
Aug 15, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 16, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 17, 2021 Bordeaux,
France
Morning Overnight
Aug 18, 2021 Bordeaux,
France
Evening
Aug 19, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 20, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 21, 2021 Vigo (Bayona), Galicia,
Spain
Morning Afternoon
Aug 22, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 23, 2021 Cadiz,
Spain
Morning Evening
Aug 24, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 25, 2021 Ibiza, Balearic Islands,
Spain
Afternoon Late Evening
Aug 26, 2021 At Sea,
Aug 27, 2021 Bonifacio, Corsica,
France
Morning Evening
Aug 28, 2021 Civitavecchia (Rome),
Italy
Morning 8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • Oslo

    Norway is a land steeped in myth, where irascible gods armed with frost and lightning once inspired Viking clans to plunder foreign lands. These days, genteel customs imported from mainland Europe have softened the country’s hard edges, but traces of an unruly past still abound. The exceptional museums dotting the Bygdøy Peninsula hold some of the city’s foremost attractions, including a thousand-year-old longship that was preserved in mud and the 12th-century Gol Stave Church, an exemplar of Norway’s distinctive wood sanctuaries. No less fascinating is a visit to the 1892 Fram, a legendary ship revered for her vital role in early polar explorations. To witness the evolution of Oslo’s soul, contrast battle-hardened Akershus Fortress, a ruggedly elegant citadel wrapped in nearly impregnable ramparts, with the neoclassical Royal Palace, whose formal exterior encloses sumptuously appointed rooms. You might wish to view Edvard Munch’s iconic The Scream, which hangs in the outstanding Norwegian National Gallery amid priceless European and Scandinavian masterworks. In expansive Frogner Park, wander among Gustav Vigeland’s thought-provoking sculptures, and if you’ve worked up an appetite, choose among the many restaurants and cafés lining the charming waterfront district of Aker Brygge.

  • At Sea

  • Little Belt Transit

  • Faaborg

  • Kiel Canal

    Thrill to one of the world’s most unique cruising experiences, a transit of the storied Kiel Canal. The idea for a waterway connecting the Baltic and North Seas was conceived by Chancellor Otto von Bismarck during the Danish-German War of 1864, as the Germans were keen to avoid Danish hostility while sailing around the Jutland Peninsula. The ambitious project, however, didn’t come to fruition until 1895 under the auspices of Wilhelm II, albeit right on budget. These days, the canal’s purpose is primarily mercantile, and it is in fact the world’s busiest shipping route. As such, you can expect to pass cargo vessels from every imaginable corner of the world carrying a mesmerizing variety of goods. While transiting, look out over a famously flat landscape of well-tended fields, dense forests and quaint villages, and pass under a succession of steel overpasses, including the fascinating Rendsburg High Bridge, both a railway viaduct and a transporter bridge. When you emerge into the open sea, you’ll have the satisfaction of having undertaken a remarkable transit only available to smaller cruising vessels.

  • Schveningen

  • Bordeaux

    Bordeaux is incontestably one of the world’s most venerable wine capitals, and a visit to this oenophile’s paradise will not disappoint lovers of the nectar of the gods. This lovely city, however, also boasts myriad architectural treasures in its UNESCO World Heritage site historic center, including the sublime Palace de la Bourse, an 18th-century marvel that is spellbindingly echoed in the adjacent reflecting pool. As you stroll the promenade on the left bank of the Garonne River, you’ll pass majestic neoclassical buildings and splendidly manicured gardens that rival Paris itself. The astonishingly preserved 15th-century Grosse Cloche and Porte Cailhau city gates are a testament to the city’s medieval sumptuousness, but for proof that Bordeaux isn’t in thrall to the past, visit La Cité du Vin, a boldly futuristic structure devoted to the history of wine throughout the ages. Of course, for a first-hand look at wine production you must venture out to the surrounding countryside, where fabulous chateaux oversee flourishing vineyards responsible for some of the world’s premier vintages. A visit to any quaint wine village is sure to enchant, but Saint-Émilion and its unspoiled feudal ambiance might just become the highlight of your trip.

  • Vigo (Bayona), Galicia

    The port of Vigo, with its strategic location in the northwest corner of Spain was constantly fought over during the many periods of war between Spain, Britain and France. Nearby Baiona is a town with a medieval historical center situated by the outlet of the Vigo Bay. On March 1, 1493, the Pinta, one of the ships from Columbus' voyage to discover the New World returned to Europe and arrived in Baiona, making the town's port the first to receive news of the discovery of America. A replica of the ship can be visited, and the event is celebrated each and every year. SeaDreamers have two land adventure options that include the sights and tastes of Bayona as well as the Unesco Awarded town of Santiago de Compostela.

  • Cadiz

    Cadiz is believed to have been founded some 3,000 years ago which could make this port city the oldest in Western Europe. The city has so much to offer its visitors with its commercial importance, stunning beaches, regional cuisine and the Unesco Awarded Donana National Park. There’s several significant landmarks in Cadiz, some of which include the yellow-domed Cathedral, the ancient roman theatre, an 18th-century watch tower, the city walls and so much more. SeaDream docks in the heart of this Andalusian town.

  • Ibiza, Balearic Islands

    Ibiza town is the largest city on this 3rd largest Balearic Spanish Island. It lies 79 kilometers (49 miles) off the coast of Valencia, in eastern Spain. Ibiza has become famous for its incredible nightlife and the electronic music that originated on the island. This UNESCO awarded city has some great land adventure options including resort golf, wine tasting, exploring the Dalt Villa and mountain biking to name a few. We try to stay late in the evening so guests can also get a taste of the nightlife.

  • Bonifacio, Corsica

    Bonifacio is one of our favorite arrivals! As we approach, the Captain navigates along the limestone cliffs giving guests a sea view of incredible Bonifacio as well as the great Aragon steps leading to the water’s edge. Shortly after the pilot will embark and the Captain will turn the yacht around and back into this very impressive fjord-like marina. This could be one of our highest rated arrivals as the guests always find it both impressive and awe inspiring.

  • Civitavecchia (Rome)

    Civitavecchia is a major port located in Rome, primarily utilized for maritime transportation of goods, as well as a fishing port. The commune’s name means “ancient town” and is one of the “Motorways of the Sea” in the Mediterranean, functioning as one of the main links between the mainland of Italy and Sardinia. The ancient name of the port was “Centumcellae,” first mentioned in a letter written by Pliny the Younger in 107 A.D., although scholars debate on whether the name was about the number of rooms of the Trajan Villa, or the number of natural creeks on the coast. Civitavecchia is a part of the Lazio Territory, an area which was confirmed to have social groups since pre-historic times, and the modern town was built over a pre-existing settlement of the Etruscan people in 107-108 B.C.E. (who debated to have founded Rome). In the beginning of the 2nd century, the harbor and town of Centumcellae were simultaneously developed by Emperor Trajan in the territory of Aquae Tauri. As the town became more popular for ships traveling westbound, the Thermal Baths were constructed on the hill of Ficoncella. Centumcellae flourished in the Imperial Age, and by 538 A.D., it had become a Byzantine stronghold. In 728 A.D., it became a member of the Papal States. The Saracens raided Centumcellae many times in the 9th century, prompting Pope Leo VII to have a newer and more secure settlement built by 854. The town, then known as Civita Vetula, was under the rule of several lords, and the Popes temporarily lost control during the French Rule in 1798-1815. In 1870 it entered the Kingdom of Italy. Civitavecchia was severely damaged during WWII, destroying many of the ancient monuments including Forte Michelangelo, which would be rebuilt in the 1950’s. Popular points of interest include the Forte Michelangelo, Terme Taurine, and Cattedrale di San Francesco. There is a wealth of Roman and Vatican architecture and tourists are encouraged to visit many of the museums and take the cultural tours available in this important sea port.


Suites & Staterooms

*Government, Port, Document Issuance, Handling & Service fees: $0 per guest


Single Supplement for this voyage is 150% for Yacht Club Deck 2,3 and 4. For Commodore, Admiral and Owners Suite, a 200% single supplement rate applies.


Please Note: Fares are capacity controlled and may change without notice. The fares are per person based on double occupancy. Single and third person rates are also available. SeaDream Yacht Club strongly recommends that all guests purchase travel insurance.


Yachting Land Adventures & Activities

Pre-Book Online for 10% savings

Prices are per person, in USD. Duration is in hours.


Testimonials

Everything from service to cuisine was first class. It is truly an experience we will never forget-we will return to take another voyage with you. Jerry & Catherine AbnerLebanon, Ohio
Another great trip with SeaDream. We so enjoyed the service & attention to detail. Sara JohnLos Angeles, California