Best of the Mediterranean Isles

Best of the Mediterranean Isles

Valletta to Malaga

Oct 24, 2026 to Nov 1, 2026

8 Days

SeaDream I

12638

Date Ports of Call Arrive Depart
Oct 24, 2026 Valletta,
Malta
2 PM - 4 PM
(Embarkation)
Evening
Oct 25, 2026 Trapani, Sicily,
Italy
Morning Evening
Oct 26, 2026 Cagliari, Sardinia,
Italy
Afternoon Evening
Oct 27, 2026 Mahon, Menorca, Balearic Islands,
Spain
Evening Overnight
Oct 28, 2026 Mahon, Menorca, Balearic Islands,
Spain
Evening
Oct 29, 2026 Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Islands,
Spain
Morning Afternoon
Oct 30, 2026 Alicante,
Spain
Morning Evening
Oct 31, 2026 Almeria,
Spain
Morning Evening
Nov 01, 2026 Malaga,
Spain
Morning 8 AM - 10 AM
(Disembarkation)

Ports

  • Valletta
    Valletta

    Valletta, The Fortress City, is Malta's capital city: a living, working city, the administrative and commercial heart of the Islands. Valletta is named after its founder, the respected Grand Master of the Order of St. John, Jean Parisot de la Valette. The magnificent fortress city grew on the arid rock of Mount Sceberras peninsula, which rises steeply from two deep harbours, Marsamxett and Grand Harbour. Ottoman forces numbering 40,000 laid siege to the island from May to September 1565, without success. The heavily outnumbered army of 700 knights and around 8000 Maltese regular troops took refuge in the fortified town on the Grand Harbour. Started in 1566, the city of Valletta was completed, with its impressive bastions, forts, and cathedral, in the astonishingly short time of 15 years. The city is busy by day, yet retains a timeless atmosphere. The grid of narrow streets boasts some of Europe's finest art works, churches and palaces. Walking around Valletta you'll come across an intriguing historical site around every corner: votive statues, niches, fountains and coats of arms high up on parapets. Narrow side streets are full of tiny quaint shops and cafes, while Valletta's main streets are lined with larger international branded shops for fashion, music, jewelry and much more.

  • Trapani, Sicily
    Trapani, Sicily

    Trapani is a city on the west coast of Sicily in Italy and was founded by Elymians. SeaDream docks in the center of town and allows incredible access for strolling into town or meeting the motor coach for the scheduled land adventures. The city is still important for fishing and is the main gateway to the nearby Egadi Islands. This Carthaginian and later Roman city is an exciting gateway to Sicily's historic, gastronomic and natural attractions, offering access to beautiful medieval towns as well as Greek archaeological sites. We highly recommend that you participate on one of our interesting land adventures and not miss the amazing sites located about 30 minutes by road from Trapani including Erici, Segesta, Marsala and more.

  • Cagliari, Sardinia
    Cagliari, Sardinia

  • Mahon, Menorca, Balearic Islands
    Mahon, Menorca, Balearic Islands

    Mahón (also known as Maó) is the capital of the Balearic Islands of Menorca. The arrival by sea is really incredible as the Captain enters via a fjord-like inlet and then turns that yacht around and docks in the heart of the city. The capital has an interesting mix of old and new architectural styles. SeaDream has arranged four separate and unique yachting land adventures that include Golf, Kayaking, Mountain Biking and “Mahon Musts”.

  • Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Islands
    Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Islands

    Situated on the southern coast of Mallorca, the largest city in the Balearic Islands archipelago is Palma. Mallorca’s cultural and economic hub is the 12th largest urban area in all of Spain. Palma has an area of 21.4 square kilometers, housing half the population of Mallorca and despite being compared to Barcelona and Florence, it is twinned with Naples, Italy. In 1983, Palma officially became the capital of the Balearic Islands. Originally founded by General Quintus Caecilius Metellus as a Roman camp in 123 B.C.E., the island of Mallorca was a part of the Tarraconensis province of Spain. The Romans established two ports, Pollentia to the northeast and Palma in the south. Palma was utilized as a port for Africa, while Pollentia was used for Roman cities in the northwest Mediterranean. Prior to the Muslim conquest and downfall of the Western Roman Empire, existed a period where the Byzantine Empire was on Mallorca. Due to the lack of documentation, the nature of this presence is unknown, but for the 10th century to 1229 A.D., Palma was under Islamic control as “Medina Mayurqa”. When James I of Aragon captured Palma in 1229, it was given municipality as “Cuitat de Mallorca”, and maintained as the capital of the Kingdom of Majorca. Perpignan and Palma became a joint capital of the Kingdom once James I of Aragon passed away. From 1229 onward, the foundations of Mallorcan society began to flourish, although various war-like events would soon take place. In 1391 began an anti-Jewish movement that forced the Jewish people to flee, convert, or be killed – actions that would ultimately be reinforced in the Inquisition. While the Revolt of 1450 was occurring, it was farmers that were then harassed. A river that divided the city would eventually spur social and economic issues as an Upper and Lower town of the city would be established. Mallorca was on the decline by the 16th century, and became a haven for pirates by the 17th century. Finally, the War of the Spanish Succession ended and destroyed the Crown of Aragon in 1714 when Barcelona fell. The city would eventually begin to thrive again as Charles III of Spain allowed commercial activity to bounce back by removing interdiction of commerce with the Spanish colonies in America. Once Algeria became occupied by France, fear of Maghredi attacks were eliminated, allowing further economic expansion with new maritime routes surfacing. Since 1950, Mallorca has become a prime tourist destination, growing from 600,000 visitors in 1960 to 19.2 million visitors by 2001. Tourists can view the old city, Arab baths, Palma Cathedral, Bellver Castle, or simply indulge in the beautiful Playa de S’amarador. For a glorious, picturesque scene of mountains, be sure to visit the Serra de Tramuntana and explore the UNESCO location overlooking the sea.

  • Alicante
    Alicante

  • Almeria
    Almeria

  • Malaga
    Malaga

    Malaga, together with adjacent towns and municipalities such as Rincon de la Victoria, Torremolinos, Benalmadena, Fuengirola, Alhaurin de la Torre, Mijas, and Marbella, forms the Malaga Metropolitan area. The important cultural infrastructure and the rich artistic heritage have culminated in the nomination of Malaga as a candidate for the 2016 European Capital of Culture. The internationally acclaimed painter and sculptor Pablo Picasso and actor Antonio Banderas were both born in Malaga. SeaDream calls to Malaga both as an embarkation point as well as a typical port of call. Kindly check on the land adventures tab to see all of the activities and options. Should you need embarkation information, it’s also available there.


Suites & Staterooms

*Government, Port, Document Issuance, Handling & Service fees: $488 per guest


Single Supplement for this voyage is 200% for Yacht Club Deck 2,3 and 4. For Commodore, Admiral and Owners Suite, a 200% single supplement rate applies.


Please Note: Fares are capacity controlled and may change without notice. The fares are per person based on double occupancy. Single and third person rates are also available. SeaDream Yacht Club strongly recommends that all guests purchase travel insurance.


Yachting Land Adventures & Activities

Pre-Book Online for 10% savings

Prices are per person, in USD. Duration is in hours.


Testimonials

... we were again thrilled and enjoyed the same high as was the case in both previous sails. Peter & Liz CulnaneBrisbane, Australia
The best vacation we have ever been on. The combination of relaxed atmosphere and impeccable service was perfect. Mr & Mrs Kurt PedersonGlastonbury, Connecticut